Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s team disagrees with Saporta’s column

Note to Readers: Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and his administration wanted an opportunity to respond to my Maria’s Metro column this week. In the interest of fairness, I am running the city’s response in full.

By Tom Weyandt, senior policy advisor for transportation for Mayor
Kasim Reed

With two critical weeks until the July 31 transportation referendum, Maria Saporta has decided to lead the pack among her journalism cohorts and pen a column that already assigns blame for the initiative’s defeat. As senior policy advisor for Transportation for Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, I disagree with Ms. Saporta’s assertion that he is at fault because the project list didn’t include enough money for rail, particularly in South DeKalb County.

Ms. Saporta writes that Mayor Reed should have allocated half of the $600 million for the Atlanta BeltLine project for a South DeKalb MARTA line, for a total of $525 million. She conveniently ignores the fact that he negotiated a series of compromises that helped to achieve unanimous consent for the TIA project list and heavily advocated for the $225 million in funding that DeKalb County will receive for rail line planning.

Because of Mayor Reed’s commitment to a transportation project list that benefits the entire region, DeKalb County will receive nearly $1 billion of the $6.14 billion in projects if voters approve the measure, and MARTA is slated for its fair share of $600 million.

Mayor Reed’s first priority, however, is always to the residents of the City of Atlanta. He should not apologize for standing firm and negotiating $600 million for the Atlanta BeltLine. If the City of Atlanta had given up $300 million to DeKalb County, our residents would have been – by far – the biggest net contributor to the region with less than a 55 percent return on investment.

As it stands, City of Atlanta projects are valued at about $896 million, and taxpayers will contribute about $915 million over 10 years, a 98 percent return in investment. In addition, the City of Atlanta is expected to receive about $94 million for local projects such as multi-use paths and trails, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, increased street lighting, and sidewalk and ADA ramp installations and repairs.

Despite the naysayers, the Atlanta Beltline was identified as a regional project by the Atlanta Regional Commission as early as 2004 and scored highest among transit projects in the evaluation. The project received the highest overall score, notably first in land use impact, second in environmental benefit and third in travel demands. When completed, the Atlanta BeltLine/Streetcar network will provide critical last-mile connectivity for residents and visitors to get to major downtown destinations from the regional network of heavy rail, regional rail, commuter rail and express bus networks. T

The Atlanta BeltLine also has been identified by GRTA as the major transit project which can be implemented almost immediately and completed within seven years – well before any of the others – and will include direct connection to at least three MARTA stations.

Mayor Reed began working on the transportation referendum initiative as a state senator and then continued tirelessly advocating for passage of House Bill 277 during his first year in office. Anyone with a scintilla of political acumen knows that achieving enough bipartisan support in the Georgia General Assembly to pass the measure was a Herculean task.

Over the next two years, he served as the chairman of the Regional Transit Committee of the Atlanta Regional Commission and worked hard to sustain a minimum of 50 percent of funding for rail. The elected leaders put aside partisan politics, whittled down a $23 billion project wish list to $6 billion, and then unanimously approved it – a signature moment for the region.

Yet, for weeks, we have read stories that tear apart the work and the effort that went into getting the metropolitan Atlanta region to this point around the transportation initiative. Ms. Saporta’s column is simply the latest attempt to throw stones at an effort that would create jobs, keep our region competitive and safeguard Atlanta’s position as the leading city in the Southeast.

I am confident our voters will continue to educate themselves, not be misled by deliberately negative stories and go to the polls on July 31.

Maria Saporta, Editor, is a longtime Atlanta business, civic and urban affairs journalist with a deep knowledge of our city, our region and state.  Since 2008, she has written a weekly column and news stories for the Atlanta Business Chronicle. Prior to that, she spent 27 years with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, becoming its business columnist in 1991. Maria received her Master’s degree in urban studies from Georgia State and her Bachelor’s degree in journalism from Boston University. Maria was born in Atlanta to European parents and has two young adult children.

38 comments
Burroughston Broch
Burroughston Broch

@ Summer Truth I agree with your post. The Mayor is in damage control mode because his political capital is attached to TSPLOST. He wants credit if it wins (not likely) and he wants cover if it doesn't win. The most amusing part is the Mayor saying that no one should tell MARTA jokes. This reminds me of the statues/sketches of three little monkeys - see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.

Burroughston Broch
Burroughston Broch

@ Summer Truth I agree with your post. The Mayor is in damage control mode because his political capital is attached to TSPLOST. He wants credit if it wins (not likely) and he wants cover if it doesn't win. The most amusing part is the Mayor saying that no one should tell MARTA jokes. This reminds me of the statues/sketches of three little monkeys - see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.

Summer Truth
Summer Truth

I read this provocative quote by the elected mayor of Atlanta (subject to change) and as an Atlanta city and Fulton county resident, I RESENT his comments about MARTA.   The quote:   "Folks need to be really careful with the MARTA jokes.  We compete all over the globe for major tourism and conventions. It impacts tens of thousands of jobs."

MARTA is not a joke.   And I don't know to whom he is referring about making jokes.    I voted NO on TSPLOST and am proud to have done so.   NO MORE TAXES THAT LAST AS LONG AS POLITICIANS CHOOSE.   Being a citizen who was LIED to about the GA 400 tolls, I have zero faith in our city/state government.   It's that simple.   I ride MARTA frequently.   WHERE was the initiative for the last 20 years to expand MARTA up/down I-75 and I-85  ?    Lost in prejudicial posturing by BOTH parties.   NO excuse.    Billions to add more lanes to the freeways ?    No way.    And when it fails ?   Oh well.    That's what you get politicians. An angry electorate and citizenry who will forever ask:   why ?     Too late.     AND there is no Plan B.    Again, where was the leadership ?   No where.          And so it goes.

Summer Truth
Summer Truth

I read this provocative quote by the elected mayor of Atlanta (subject to change) and as an Atlanta city and Fulton county resident, I RESENT his comments about MARTA.   The quote:   "Folks need to be really careful with the MARTA jokes.  We compete all over the globe for major tourism and conventions. It impacts tens of thousands of jobs." MARTA is not a joke.   And I don't know to whom he is referring about making jokes.    I voted NO on TSPLOST and am proud to have done so.   NO MORE TAXES THAT LAST AS LONG AS POLITICIANS CHOOSE.   Being a citizen who was LIED to about the GA 400 tolls, I have zero faith in our city/state government.   It's that simple.   I ride MARTA frequently.   WHERE was the initiative for the last 20 years to expand MARTA up/down I-75 and I-85  ?    Lost in prejudicial posturing by BOTH parties.   NO excuse.    Billions to add more lanes to the freeways ?    No way.    And when it fails ?   Oh well.    That's what you get politicians. An angry electorate and citizenry who will forever ask:   why ?     Too late.     AND there is no Plan B.    Again, where was the leadership ?   No where.          And so it goes.

Ryan
Ryan

[email protected] I'm surprised you didn't post Catherine Ross's WSJ OpEd from 2 years ago extolling all the benefits of the Beltline. A lot can change in 5 years you know. In 2005 there were serious doubts as to whether the city could ever even purchase all the land to make a continuous loop.   But hey, you have a history of holding up infrastructure projects, so I can't say I'm shocked to see more dishonest and selective linking from you.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected] Given the critical importance of the Beltline to the City of Atlanta's economic future, the City of Atlanta should be funding the Beltline itself, not by way of a regional referendum that is highly-subject to rejection by voters with their own unique political and social interests outside of the jurisdiction of the City of Atlanta.

Ray1
Ray1

As a resident of South Dekalb I agree it is not the mayors responsibility to advocate for Dekalb. However, I have not spoken to a single person in this area who supports this thing. We see almost nothing that will relieve traffic in the area. The proposed $225m bus terminal is about as popular as if Walmart proposed one of their super centers for West Paces Ferry rd. We see absolutely no reason to pay 25% ($.01 MARTA & .$.01 TSPLOST out of $.08 total)of each non-food sales tax purchase and see almost useful in return. The planners must have been smoking something if they thought this thing would have any support in. South Dekalb.

Ray1
Ray1

As a resident of South Dekalb I agree it is not the mayors responsibility to advocate for Dekalb. However, I have not spoken to a single person in this area who supports this thing. We see almost nothing that will relieve traffic in the area. The proposed $225m bus terminal is about as popular as if Walmart proposed one of their super centers for West Paces Ferry rd. We see absolutely no reason to pay 25% ($.01 MARTA & .$.01 TSPLOST out of $.08 total)of each non-food sales tax purchase and see almost useful in return. The planners must have been smoking something if they thought this thing would have any support in. South Dekalb.

Ready2Drive
Ready2Drive

This referendum will impact the region on a whole.  Not just one particular county or area.  That's the purpose, to make it easier to travel throughout the Metro Atlanta area.  

Ready2Drive
Ready2Drive

This referendum will impact the region on a whole.  Not just one particular county or area.  That's the purpose, to make it easier to travel throughout the Metro Atlanta area.  

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected]  Yes, I agree as I can see just how projects like a new Air Traffic Control Tower and new runway approach lights  at Cobb County Airport / McCollum Field will dramatically improve rush hour travel on one of the region's many gridlocked roads. http://documents.atlantaregional.com/tia/pdf/TIA-CO-018.pdf http://documents.atlantaregional.com/tia/pdf/TIA-CO-020.pdf    Like you, I am absolutely certain that those hundreds-of-thousands of commuters stuck in gridlock on US 41, I-75 & I-575 are jumping for joy at the prospect of that new air traffic control tower and those new runway lights approach lights significantly lightening up those miserable rush hour commutes.   It's too bad that the public seems totally unaware of the magical powers of air traffic control towers and runway approach lights to dramatically improve traffic flow on major highways.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

Great post and great response with some very good points, Chamblee54!   These three passages from Chamblee54's response are very reflective of nearly everything that is wrong with this whole debacle:   {{The phrase that caught PG’s eye was  “scintilla of political acumen”. This campaign is not going to be decided by policy wonks. It will be decided by the brothers in Lithonia, and the bubbas in Cumming. (The spell check suggestion for bubbas is Barabbas.) When you throw phrases like “scintilla of political acumen” at this crowd, they think you are talking over their heads. And they are correct. Both OTP and ITP feel they are being taken advantage of by this proposal.}}   {{PG is the type of person who would ordinarily support a proposal like T-SPLOST. He began to turn against it the day he received a phone call from a supporter. The lady read from a script, throwing out claims about how many jobs would be created by T-SPLOST. The BS detector started to buzz, and gets louder every day...}}   {{...The transportation needs of the region are immense. This proposal is poorly conceived. The well funded marketing campaign has been arrogant and tone deaf.  If Coca Cola had been sold like this, we would all drink Pepsi today. One wonders if the same idiots who are running the ad campaign, in support of T-SPLOST, are the same people who created the project list. T-SPLOST is in trouble, and not even a miracle might be able to help.}}

RegionalTransitSupporter
RegionalTransitSupporter

The problem I have with all this talk about the Beltline is the blurring of the lines between the Beltline and the new street car system.    The Beltline as presented to the public for years was the loop around the city that was part of  graduate thesis in 1999 by Ryan Gravel (sic).  The so called Beltline projects on the TIA list are not part of the Betline but of a street car system that would provide the spokes if want to call them that to the loop or circle around downtown.  I'd prefer to see the Beltline rail line partially funded with the TIA although we need the street cars also.  The usurping of the name and concept only serves to support contention by many that the government is not to be trusted.  That being said the TIA list is compromise that seems mroe concerned with getting the tax passed than to provide the start of the massive infrastructure investment the region needs. 

 

There are too many local projects included that are a stretch to say they are of regional importance while projects that are of regional importance like extension of light rail lines connecting to MARTA in DeKalb, Gwinnett and Cobb as well as across the top end perimeter get either more study money (Gwinnett) or a potential short-term fix in BRT (Cobb and south DeKalb).  At least the Clifton corridor rail line made the list but it is appalling to see $40M added to the list for Gwinnett County Transit that will be used not to add service as this tax should be used but to replace funding that now comes from the general fund.  Im noti sure how anyone could claim that spending $296M in rural eastern Gwinnett to extend a road in the former ROW of the Outer Perimeter is of regional importance especially when as the fall back plan millions of dollars were spent improving SR20 that runs parallel to the proposed road after the Outer Perimeter highway was cancelled.   That $296M would be far better spent starting construction of a light rail line extending from the DoravIlle MARTA station running parallel to I-85 and running along the top end perimeter a route where highway congestion is among the worst in the region.  An alternative route for commuters in that corridor is badly needed.  

 

Strangely enough the GaDOT and GRTA jointly funded a study that began in 2006 and was supposed to be completed in 2011 that would have completed design and Environmental Impact Studies of solutions along the top end perimeter.  The proposals that came out of this study (revive285.com) were whittled down to four possibilities by the end of 2010 and then we heard nothing more.  I find it strange that the nothing came out of that study as a project to be considered for the TIA.  You could say the reconstruction fo the SR400 and I-285 interchange came from that study but in reality it has been in the planning stages since before the DOT/GRTA study began and was just incoporated into it.  Could it be that because the plans for the top end perimeter in themselves ($4-5B) would have taken most of the money to raised by the TIA tax? 

 

The biggest problem with this TIA is that it doesn't address the $160B in projects identified in Concept 3 and from the rhetoric from the legislature we shouldn't expect any more funding even if this does pass.  Where is the leadership in this region?  Why is the state legislature not stepping up and funding transportation at a competitive level with most other states?  Why is the legislature satisfied with being 47th out of 50 states in per capita spending on transportation?  Why are other states passing taxes solely for mass transit while Georgia sits idly by watching them?  Why does Georgia let Atlanta trail far behind the two other cities (San Francisco and Washington, D.C.) that built transit rail lines in the 70's in system miles?  Support the TIA or not we need more transportation funding in the near future.

RegionalTransitSupporter
RegionalTransitSupporter

The problem I have with all this talk about the Beltline is the blurring of the lines between the Beltline and the new street car system.    The Beltline as presented to the public for years was the loop around the city that was part of  graduate thesis in 1999 by Ryan Gravel (sic).  The so called Beltline projects on the TIA list are not part of the Betline but of a street car system that would provide the spokes if want to call them that to the loop or circle around downtown.  I'd prefer to see the Beltline rail line partially funded with the TIA although we need the street cars also.  The usurping of the name and concept only serves to support contention by many that the government is not to be trusted.  That being said the TIA list is compromise that seems mroe concerned with getting the tax passed than to provide the start of the massive infrastructure investment the region needs.    There are too many local projects included that are a stretch to say they are of regional importance while projects that are of regional importance like extension of light rail lines connecting to MARTA in DeKalb, Gwinnett and Cobb as well as across the top end perimeter get either more study money (Gwinnett) or a potential short-term fix in BRT (Cobb and south DeKalb).  At least the Clifton corridor rail line made the list but it is appalling to see $40M added to the list for Gwinnett County Transit that will be used not to add service as this tax should be used but to replace funding that now comes from the general fund.  Im noti sure how anyone could claim that spending $296M in rural eastern Gwinnett to extend a road in the former ROW of the Outer Perimeter is of regional importance especially when as the fall back plan millions of dollars were spent improving SR20 that runs parallel to the proposed road after the Outer Perimeter highway was cancelled.   That $296M would be far better spent starting construction of a light rail line extending from the DoravIlle MARTA station running parallel to I-85 and running along the top end perimeter a route where highway congestion is among the worst in the region.  An alternative route for commuters in that corridor is badly needed.     Strangely enough the GaDOT and GRTA jointly funded a study that began in 2006 and was supposed to be completed in 2011 that would have completed design and Environmental Impact Studies of solutions along the top end perimeter.  The proposals that came out of this study (revive285.com) were whittled down to four possibilities by the end of 2010 and then we heard nothing more.  I find it strange that the nothing came out of that study as a project to be considered for the TIA.  You could say the reconstruction fo the SR400 and I-285 interchange came from that study but in reality it has been in the planning stages since before the DOT/GRTA study began and was just incoporated into it.  Could it be that because the plans for the top end perimeter in themselves ($4-5B) would have taken most of the money to raised by the TIA tax?    The biggest problem with this TIA is that it doesn't address the $160B in projects identified in Concept 3 and from the rhetoric from the legislature we shouldn't expect any more funding even if this does pass.  Where is the leadership in this region?  Why is the state legislature not stepping up and funding transportation at a competitive level with most other states?  Why is the legislature satisfied with being 47th out of 50 states in per capita spending on transportation?  Why are other states passing taxes solely for mass transit while Georgia sits idly by watching them?  Why does Georgia let Atlanta trail far behind the two other cities (San Francisco and Washington, D.C.) that built transit rail lines in the 70's in system miles?  Support the TIA or not we need more transportation funding in the near future.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected]  Excellent post with many great points.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected]  You make some excellent points about the insistence of a total lack of leadership from the State Legislature on an issue that is as so vitally critical and important as transportation.   The Georgia Legislature has let it be known time and again that they have absolutely no interest in performing their constitutionally-mandated duties of managing or funding transportation, especially as it relates to the complex needs of the multifaceted transportation infrastructure of the increasingly-ultradiverse Atlanta Region.   The completely-disinterested Georgia Legislature is the reason why there effectively is no leadership on the transportation issue in the fast-growing Atlanta Region and, unfortunately, there may not be any leadership on the transportation issue in this state as it relates to the Atlanta Region for a very-long time, if ever.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected]  {{"Could it be that because the plans for the top end perimeter in themselves ($4-5B) would have taken most of the money to raised by the TIA tax?"}}   You got it!  The plans for what would be required to relieve the increasingly-severe traffic congestion that plagues the Top End Perimeter of I-285 between the I-75 NW and I-85 NE spokes would cost upwards of $5 billion as there is a similar project that the State of Texas has undertaken to completely overhaul roughly 13 miles of the very-busy and severely-congested Interstate 635/LBJ Freeway Loop across the Northside of Dallas in which the freeway is being double-decked to double the existing capacity of the freeway to accommodate the increasingly heavy amounts of freight truck traffic that the road carries. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMc-ZPWo2nQ http://www.lbjexpress.com/   Just that one project to overhaul those 13 miles of the I-635/LBJ Freeway Loop alone will cost over $5 billion.   What is especially notable to this discussion is that the I-635/LBJ Freeway serves a geographical and logistical function on the Northside of Dallas that is similar to the geographical and logistical function that the I-285 Top End Perimeter serves for the Northside of Atlanta, the only difference is that the Northside of Dallas (and the Dallas-Fort Worth area as a whole) has a much more extensive network of 4-6 lane major surface roads on a N-S, E-W grid and also has what could be described as two Outer Perimeter-type loops that lie outside of the I-635 Loop to the north of the city, meaning that the State of Texas is still spending $5 billion to overhaul and double-deck an I-635 Loop that has nowhere nearly the traffic stress that the I-285 Top End Perimeter has due to the almost total lack of a viable surface road network and outlying E-W cross-regional alternatives for through traffic.   There are no major E-W routes that come anywhere close to paralleling the I-285 Top End Perimeter within between 3-17 miles of the road, meaning that I-285 is basically the only option for cross-regional traffic between the I-75 NW and I-85 NE spokes for very many miles.   One could argue that the I-285 Top End Perimeter across the Northside of Atlanta is in much greater need of an overhaul than the I-635 Loop on the Northside of Dallas because of the much-greater role that I-285 plays in moving local, regional and through traffic for the Northside of the Atlanta Region than I-635 plays for the Northside of the Atlanta Region and yet, the State of Georgia seems to be in absolutely no hurry to do anything anytime soon to relieve traffic in that or any of the other numerous severely-congested and gridlocked transportation corridors in the Atlanta Region and North Georgia.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected]  {{"[I'm not] sure how anyone could claim that spending $296M in rural eastern Gwinnett to extend a road in the former ROW of the Outer Perimeter is of regional importance especially when as the fall back plan millions of dollars were spent improving SR20 that runs parallel to the proposed road after the Outer Perimeter highway was cancelled.   That $296M would be far better spent starting construction of a light rail line extending from the DoravIlle MARTA station running parallel to I-85 and running along the top end perimeter a route where highway congestion is among the worst in the region.  An alternative route for commuters in that corridor is badly needed."}}   You make a great point.  That Gwinnett County project to extend Sugarloaf Parkway in the right-of-way of the abandoned Northern Arc/Outer Perimeter from Georgia Highway 316 in Dacula to Georgia Highway 20 near the Mall of Georgia in Buford should have been funded and built as toll road by Gwinnett County as was originally proposed by the county government before the public backlash against the I-85 HOT Lane debacle which caused Gwinnett County to panic and rush to get what should obviously be a toll-financed project on the list.   The inclusion of the Sugarloaf Parkway Extension on the project list is one of the reasons that is often cited by many residents of Fulton and DeKalb counties as to why they are not voting for the T-SPLOST.   It would seem that the authors of this T-SPLOST debacle would recognize that extremely road expansion-averse pro-transit urbanites in Fulton and DeKalb counties would not be in the least bit likely to vote to raise their own taxes to help build a new freeway in the right-of-way of one of this state's most-hated, most-despised and most-infamous road projects ever, the Northern Arc.   The powers-that-be that put together this poorly thought-out and highly-flawed piece of T-SPLOST legislation should have been keenly aware that the same Intowners who vigorously led the effort to successfully defeat that extremely-unpopular road a decade ago would not be likely to approve of being asked to fund a suburban road project in the right-of-way of that same road they hated so much.   It is political miscalculations like that that are why this T-SPLOST is struggling so mightily to connect with the public.

The Last Democrat in Georgia
The Last Democrat in Georgia

[email protected]  {{"[I'm not] sure how anyone could claim that spending $296M in rural eastern Gwinnett to extend a road in the former ROW of the Outer Perimeter is of regional importance especially when as the fall back plan millions of dollars were spent improving SR20 that runs parallel to the proposed road after the Outer Perimeter highway was cancelled.   That $296M would be far better spent starting construction of a light rail line extending from the DoravIlle MARTA station running parallel to I-85 and running along the top end perimeter a route where highway congestion is among the worst in the region.  An alternative route for commuters in that corridor is badly needed."}}   You make a great point.  That Gwinnett County project to extend Sugarloaf Parkway in the right-of-way of the abandoned Northern Arc/Outer Perimeter from Georgia Highway 316 in Dacula to Georgia Highway 20 near the Mall of Georgia in Buford should have been funded and built as toll road by Gwinnett County as was originally proposed by the county government before the public backlash against the I-85 HOT Lane debacle which caused Gwinnett County to panic and rush to get what should obviously be a toll-financed project on the list.   The inclusion of the Sugarloaf Parkway Extension on the project list is one of the reasons that is often cited by many residents of Fulton and DeKalb counties as to why they are not voting for the T-SPLOST.   It would seem that the authors of this T-SPLOST debacle would recognize that extremely road expansion-averse pro-transit urbanites in Fulton and DeKalb counties would not be in the least bit likely to vote to raise their own taxes to help build a new freeway in the right-of-way of one of this state's most-hated, most-despised and most-infamous road projects ever, the Northern Arc.   The powers-that-be that put together this poorly thought-out and highly-flawed piece of T-SPLOST legislation should have been keenly aware that the same Intowners who vigorously led the effort to successfully defeat that extremely-unpopular road a decade ago would not be likely to approve of being asked to fund a suburban road project in the right-of-way of that same road they hated so much.   It is political miscalculations like that that are why this T-SPLOST is struggling is increasingly being seen as a complete political and public relations debacle instead of a potential solution to our increasingly overwhelming transportation and mobility problems.

Bill Simon
Bill Simon

Good one, Steve.  Maria just cannot help but shove her foot in her mouth.

mariasaporta
mariasaporta moderator

Steve, for the record, I said we weren't going to run any more "guest columns" on the referendum before the election because we only had one slot left.  It wouldn't be fair to either side to just run one side.  But my offer for you to write a "What Now" guest column after the vote still stands. Maria

mariasaporta
mariasaporta

Steve, for the record, I said we weren't going to run any more "guest columns" on the referendum before the election because we only had one slot left.  It wouldn't be fair to either side to just run one side.  But my offer for you to write a "What Now" guest column after the vote still stands. Maria

SteveBrown
SteveBrown

Funny, I asked to write a column as part the Transportation Leadership Coalition and was told no more columns before the election.  I guess it depends on who you are.

SteveBrown
SteveBrown

Funny, I asked to write a column as part the Transportation Leadership Coalition and was told no more columns before the election.  I guess it depends on who you are.

Trackbacks

  1. […] “blame” article. They asked to write a reply, and the bloglady gave them some space. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s team disagrees with Saporta’s column was the result. If this is the best the pro T-SPLOST people can do, then the measure should be […]