How propaganda changes the way people think

This week, ANNETTE LAING, public historian and author, examines the use and impact of propaganda during World War I.

By Annette Laing

Propaganda as we know it today was an invention of World War I. No previous war had ever required such a massive level of justification and suspension of disbelief. After war ignited in Europe in the summer of 1914, the corpses of young men piled up at a staggering rate. In a horrific meeting of barbed wire, mud, trenches, shells, machine guns, romanticized ideas of warfare, and fragile human bodies, the conflict required massive mobilization not only of troops but of public opinion.

What’s your favorite color

They say the human eye can distinguish upwards of 7-million different colors. With so many options, it makes one wonder just how picky must Steve Jobs have been that he had to design his own shade of white because he couldn’t find one he felt worked for his computers.

Underground Atlanta sale likely to happen by end of March

After several deadlines have come and gone, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and WRS Realty said they are working to close the sale of Underground Atlanta by the end of March.

“We are just working really hard to bring it to a conclusion,” Reed said Monday morning. Asked if it would happen by the end of March, Reed said: “We are working as hard as possible to close by the end of the month.”

Most Georgians support civil rights protections for LGBT community

A large majority of Georgians (74 percent) support passing a state law to protect gay and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodations, according to a survey conducted by the Just Win Foundation.

But the same survey shows that an equal percentage of Georgians think it’s already illegal under state law to fire, refuse to hire, deny housing or public accommodations access to a person who is gay or transgender.

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Leafing soon by Kelly Jordan

Georgia residents leverage solarize programs for residential solar growth

By Guest Columnist BETH BOND, curator of Sustainable News, Southeast Green

Last summer in a Green Tech Media article, Georgia Power received a disturbing headline. The headline was Georgia Power’s Rooftop Solar Program Signs Up Only 5 Customers. The implication was there was no solar market in Georgia for residential sign-ups. After all, the article reported, there were over 10,000 inquiries but only five customers who had actually signed up and gotten a solar installation. What was wrong with Georgia citizens?

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Column: Families First CEO Anderson stepping down, interim CEO named

As published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on March 3, 2017

After eight years at the helm of Families First, CEO Kim Anderson is planning to step down on May 1. She will serve as a consultant to the organization through Aug. 31.

The Families First board has appointed Dr. MiShawna Moore, the nonprofit’s chief program officer, as its interim CEO. The organization plans to conduct a nationwide search for Anderson’s successor.

“On behalf of Atlanta’s families and children, we are incredibly grateful for Kim’s years of service,” said Marybeth Leamer, chair of the Families First board who is also executive vice president of Cox Enterprises. “She has transformed the organization through her leadership and vision, gaining the trust of philanthropy, corporations and community. We know her passion for service will continue to change lives by furthering the hard work required to break cycles of generational poverty, in Atlanta and beyond.”

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Underground Atlanta master plan heavy on parking and light on preservation

An updated masterplan for the redevelopment of Underground Atlanta was presented Thursday to a committee of Invest Atlanta.

Although it is labeled as a “conceptual” plan, several members of the public were concerned about the number of new parking spaces – 2,189 – that are envisioned to be part of the Underground development. That is in addition to the two existing Underground Atlanta garages.

Speaker David Ralston talks transit, religious liberty and a possible run for governor

In a talk to the Atlanta Press Club Wednesday, Georgia House Speaker David Ralston spent a great portion of the speech talking about transit.

Ralston had already made news in January when he proposed setting up a House Commission to study transit. He also made a point that the Commission was not being put together to “take over” any existing transit agency (a point that was welcomed by MARTA officials at the time).

Now the state is well on its way to establishing the transit commission, which Ralston told the Press Club that it would not be another “study committee,” but a “real effort” to advance the development of transit in Georgia.

A wartime skill finds new life

One of the challenges of our 21st century lifestyle is trying to process the unprecedented amount of information available at any given moment. We are subjected to so much input on so many different topics that it is hard for us to imagine how people got along before the invention of instantaneous communications. It helps, […]