Posts

coal ash, editorial cartoon

Who killed the proposed stronger regulations for toxic coal ash?

By Guest Columnist DINK NESMITH, a Jesup native who is president and co-owner of Athens-based Community Newspapers, Inc., publishers of newspapers in Georgia, Florida and North Carolina

If fictional detective Sherlock Holmes were roaming the halls of the Georgia General Assembly, he could give an “elementary” clue why the proposed strengthening of coal-ash handling died before 2017’s Crossover Day. “My dear Watson,” the pipe-smoking sleuth would say, “follow the money.”

Pullman Yard, trees, toomer elementary school

Pullman Yard: APS supports tree protection, proposed farm and nature center

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated with a comment from the board that oversees the Kirkwood Neighborhood Association. –
Atlanta’s school superintendent is backing an effort to protect a 10-acre stand of trees and the development of an urban farm and nature center at the site of Pullman Yard, the 27-acre site in Kirkwood that the state of Georgia is selling as a likely mixed use development.

IMG_0129

Georgia residents leverage solarize programs for residential solar growth

By Guest Columnist BETH BOND, curator of Sustainable News, Southeast Green

Last summer in a Green Tech Media article, Georgia Power received a disturbing headline. The headline was Georgia Power’s Rooftop Solar Program Signs Up Only 5 Customers. The implication was there was no solar market in Georgia for residential sign-ups. After all, the article reported, there were over 10,000 inquiries but only five customers who had actually signed up and gotten a solar installation. What was wrong with Georgia citizens?

bumble bee

Tips on how to garden sustainably

By Guest Columnist SUSAN VARLAMOFF, the former director of the University of Georgia’s Office of Environmental Sciences in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and lifetime Master Gardener

Landscapes occupy vast swaths of land across urban and suburban areas in the U.S. and how we cultivate our gardens directly affects the surrounding environment. Since Atlanta is bisected by the Chattahoochee River, which serves as a drinking water source, runoff from the land directly impacts the river’s water quality. Misuse or overuse of fertilizers and pesticides can result in water contamination as these chemicals run off the land during rain events.