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Atlanta has called four meetings to discuss project lists for the proposed sales tax increases for transit and transportation. File

Atlanta calls four meetings on transportation sales taxes; last two fall after deadline for preliminary project list

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed’s administration on Thursday called four public meetings to gather input about the two proposed transportation sales tax referendums that Reed wants on the Nov. 8 ballot. By state law, MARTA must present a preliminary list to the city by May 31 for a proposed transit tax increase to appear on a ballot this year.

Dobbins, cool bus stop

Atlanta’s moment? Convergence of housing people can afford plus access to transit

By Guest Columnist MIKE DOBBINS, professor of the practice of planning at Georgia Tech’s College of Architecture and a former commissioner of planning and community development for the City of Atlanta

Against the backdrop of an antagonistic and often toxic campaign season, two opportunities are emerging that could begin to lift Atlanta out of its wealth gap, the city’s own divisive and persistent stain.

Ponce sidewalk

City of Atlanta has opportunity to invest in sidewalks and bicycle paths

It’s a given. The City of Atlanta will go to voters in November to propose an additional half-penny in taxes over the next 40 years for MARTA. That tax alone initially is expected to generate more than $50 million a year.

But the City of Atlanta also has the option to ask voters whether they want to approve another half penny for five years for general transportation projects.

Dobbins, Next phase

Transit Planning 101 for the City of Atlanta: It’s not too late

By Guest Columnist MIKE DOBBINS, professor of the practice of planning at Georgia Tech’s College of Architecture and a former commissioner of planning and community development for the City of Atlanta

Transit is a good. In an ideal world it gets people where they want to go, cleanly, efficiently, and affordably. Transit fills a need. Twenty percent of Atlanta’s citizens are living at or below the poverty line; additionally, a growing percentage of the population doesn’t drive. This might be because they’re too old, too young, or because they simply don’t want to.