An eternal supply

Pay a visit to pretty much any cemetery in the world and you will notice that, in addition to the traditional gift of flowers, people leave all kinds of items behind after their visit. Stones and coins are a favored way to show that the departed has not been forgotten, as are pictures and family mementos. But for some people, what is left behind is influenced by tradition. As you might expect, that tradition is the subject of this week’s Stories of Atlanta.

Lance Russell is an Atlanta-based filmmaker and media communicator who, for over three decades, has been entrusted by clients to tell their stories. A seasoned producer with an innate ability to cut to the heart of the matter, Lance’s instincts are tailor-made for today’s “media bite” culture. Brief, poignant and always entertaining, Lance’s current passion is bringing Atlanta’s colorful and inspiring past to life with his “rest of the story” style video series, Stories of Atlanta. “History’s best communicators,” says Lance, “have always been storytellers. It’s in our DNA. ‘Once upon a time’ is how we got to where we are now.”

1 reply
  1. Greg Hodges says:

    A great ‘Story’, Lance. I too have noticed objects left at gravesites….usually smooth stones placed atop monuments. Did not know about the golf balls !
    Several years ago I was visiting the graves of my maternal grandparents at Westview Cemetery in SW Atlanta. The Candler family plot is about 100 or so paces from my grandparent’s, and so I strolled over to take a look. Asa Candler is buried in a row of other Candler family members, but sitting squarely atop Mr. Coca Cola’s grave marker was a bright red and white can (unopened) of what else….the Pause that Refreshes.Report

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