Atlanta to pay security firm same amount for five months work as for two years of guarding city venues

By David Pendered

The Atlanta City Council is slated to approve Monday a $3.3 million, five-month contract for a security firm to provide guards at city venues, an amount that’s close what it paid the same company for two years of service, city records show.

Norred & Associates, Inc. is slated to sign a contract extension for providing security services to Atlanta. Credit: norred.com

Norred & Associates, Inc. is slated to sign a contract extension for providing security services to Atlanta. Credit: norred.com

The pending proposal is to pay $3.295 million for a five-month contract. In May 2011, the council approved a contract for $3.262 million for two years of security guard services provided by Atlanta-based Norred & Associates, Inc.

In addition to the new contract, the council also is slated to approve legislation to pay Norred $109,357 for the work it had done between the expiration of its contract, this past May, and the Aug. 28 date noted as the start of the five-month period outlined in the new contract. The legislation authorizes guards to be armed while patrolling city property.

Both proposals are on the consent agenda of the council’s meeting Monday, meaning they can be approved without being deliberated individually. The council routinely approves papers in this fashion when they’re deemed not controversial.

The council approved the initial contract with Norred on May 16, 2011. The resolution states that in hiring Norred, Atlanta was entering a cooperative purchasing agreement with Norred that utilized a Fulton County contract. The process is acceptable under Atlanta’s strict procurement codes, the legislation indicates.

Atlanta’s proposed new contract with Norred does not mention the Fulton County contract.

The proposed contract states that the Department of Procurement approved, on May 30, a 90-day extension of Norred’s existing contract. According to the legislation:

  • “The 90-day extension has expired and a new solicitation was not solicited and awarded prior to the Aug. 28, 2013 extension. This legislation will allow Norred and Associated [sic] to continue to provide security guard services until a new solicitation is awarded.”

The contract provides for guards to be armed or unarmed, though the legislation does not specify at which venues the guards are to be armed.

The venues mentioned by name in the legislation include Oakland Cemetery, the Atlanta Civic Center, Public Works, and the Office of Enterprise Asset Management.

According to Atlanta’s website, the OEAM is responsible for 51 city-owned facilities including:

  • Atlanta City Hall;
  • Atlanta Municipal Court;
  • Birdine, Dunbar, and Georgia Hill neighborhood centers;
  • Public Safety headquarters;
  • Public Safety annex;
  • 911 center;
  • Atlanta Workforce Development Authority;
  • 34 fire stations;
  • 8 police precincts;
  • Atlanta Detention Center.

Norred is headquartered in Atlanta and has offices in 19 other cities, according to its website. Greg Norred founded the company in 1981 and it now has 1,000 employees who perform security functions including uniformed officers, pre-employment screening, investigative expertise and security consulting.

 

David Pendered, Managing Editor, is an Atlanta journalist with more than 30 years experience reporting on the region’s urban affairs, from Atlanta City Hall to the state Capitol. Since 2008, he has written for print and digital publications, and advised on media and governmental affairs. Previously, he spent more than 26 years with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and won awards for his coverage of schools and urban development. David graduated from North Carolina State University and was a Western Knight Center Fellow. David was born in Pennsylvania, grew up in North Carolina and is married to a fifth-generation Atlantan.

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