Season 2 Moments

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Kevin Rathbun’s Moment was tearful one, stirred into a lifelong family recipe in the restaurant business

By Chris Schroder

Chef Kevin Rathbun had invested months of time, as well as a lot of money and sweat on his relatively risky idea to open his first restaurant off the beaten path in Atlanta’s Inman Park neighborhood. As he prepared to open the doors on his first night, he added an unexpected ingredient to what would soon become a legendary menu: his tears.

Kevin’s defining Moment in his career wasn’t conceiving the idea for his first restaurant – it was the day it opened. “I remember getting done talking to all of the waiters and sharing a glass of champagne and I started to tear up,” he said. “I didn’t want to do that in front of the whole staff so I finished the line-up and immediately went in the bathroom and cried.”

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Larrie Del Martin’s Moment led to renovating intown homes and building Atlanta’s Habitat for Humanity

By Chris Schroder

President and CEO of Atlanta Habitat, Larrie Del Martin, had her Moment in 1972 when she and her husband Joe decided to live in and contribute to what was then a struggling intown neighborhood for the sake of community rather than an easier lifestyle.

At the time Larrie Del and her husband were making this decision, intown Atlanta was struggling. A desegregation lawsuit was negatively affecting the schools, and the Georgia Department of Transportation was bulldozing houses and trees in Inman Park and Virginia-Highland to build Interstate 485 towards Stone Mountain. Families were fleeing and property values were sinking.

“We purposefully decided, ‘this is where we want to be, this is going to be our downtown community and we are going to make a difference,” she said. “That was who we were – we didn’t ever take the easy road. We didn’t know how hard it would be, but it was the right thing.”

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Mike Luckovich learned lessons about the power of the cartoonist’s pen at an early age

By Chris Schroder

Ruffling feathers with a cartoon isn’t unfamiliar territory for Atlanta Journal-Constitution editorial cartoonist, Mike Luckovich, but his approach to his cartoons was permanently defined by a high school Moment. Luckovich was a sophomore in high school at Sheldon High School in Eugene, Oregon and had just begun drawing cartoons for the school newspaper.

He joked, “In high school, believe it or not, I was not a very big guy” and described how the rest of his peers towered over him – even the Sheldon High School cheerleaders. “So I did this cartoon – I don’t know what I was thinking,” he said.

The cartoon depicted a freak museum with a billboard marquis that read: “Freak Museum: featuring Snerdily the boy with three nostrils, Melvin the deformed hippo and main attraction: The Sheldon Cheerleaders.”

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Rev. Dan Matthews was on phone as his father described 9/11 tragedy outside his window

By Chris Schroder

On September 11, 2001, Dan Matthews was reading in his office when the phone rang, disturbing his quiet time. When the current rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in downtown Atlanta picked up the phone, he heard the shaken and uncertain voice of his characteristically calm and collected father.

“Danny, I’m not sure what just happened,” his father said.

Dan’s father was rector of Trinity Church in New York’s Wall Street district. His office was on the 24th floor of a building behind the church, a mere stone’s throw from the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center.