Downtown became more challenging

Henry Ford once said, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”  However, in true Henry Ford style, he did not ask for opinions and what we got was the “horseless carriage.” And the world has never been the same.

Americans have long had a love affair with the automobile.  For more than a century, cars have gotten us where we need to be or just away from where we are.  Over the years, they have been emblematic of the state of the art, from the steam-powered Locomobiles of the early 20th century to the Wi-Fi-enabled, computer aided models of today.  For many of us, cars are an integral part of life.

In Atlanta, the “horseless carriage” made its debut on the streets in 1904.  Its popularity rapidly grew to the point where, in 1949, the original streetcar – for so long a popular mode of transportation in the city – ran its last route.  From then on, the car ruled Atlanta’s roadways.

Over the years, the growth of the automobile industry has spawned the introduction of other innovations, not all of them welcomed. Such was the case with the subject of this week’s Stories of Atlanta.

Lance Russell is an Atlanta-based filmmaker and media communicator who, for over three decades, has been entrusted by clients to tell their stories. A seasoned producer with an innate ability to cut to the heart of the matter, Lance’s instincts are tailor-made for today’s “media bite” culture. Brief, poignant and always entertaining, Lance’s current passion is bringing Atlanta’s colorful and inspiring past to life with his “rest of the story” style video series, Stories of Atlanta. “History’s best communicators,” says Lance, “have always been storytellers. It’s in our DNA. ‘Once upon a time’ is how we got to where we are now.”

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