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Live Healthy, Atlanta! Thought Leader

Find the Best Medicare Part D or Advantage Plan with Free Website

When many of the 46 million Medicare enrollees try to navigate the official Medicare website, they are often bombarded with dozens of plans with varying costs and benefits. The daunting task of choosing the best plan leaves many customers with a plan that doesn’t fit their financial or health needs.

Beginning in 2006, the U.S. government began to help pay for the cost of outpatient prescription drugs for people on Medicare. Part D and Advantage plans, which cover the cost of outpatient prescriptions, are voluntary outpatient plans provided through private insurance companies that have contracts with the government. The drug coverage is not provided directly by the government.  More than 50 types of coverage plans exist that include varying types of co-pays, premiums, prescriptions, deductibles and more.

Last year, a study revealed that the average person enrolled in Part D could save $368 a year, with most people saving much more, if they switched to a different plan that would cover the same medicines. The study revealed that only 5 percent of people chose the least expensive plan for their needs.

Thanks to an Atlanta-based internist Dr. Steve Cohen, a new educational website, www.MedicareDrugSavings.org, has been created to help struggling enrollees choose the best plan to cover medication costs. The free, nonprofit website’s main feature is a comprehensive video that explains step-by-step instructions in layman’s terms on how to best select a plan that fits an individual’s financial and health needs.

“After seeing patients struggling to pay for their lifesaving medicine, I knew I had to create a resource to help people save money on their healthcare and hopefully improve their health by making it affordable,” said website founder Dr. Cohen.

In addition to the 17-minute video, the website includes a helpful slideshow for individuals to consult while choosing the best plan for them. The website also features a five-minute video aimed specifically at healthcare professionals, along with printable brochures for professionals to provide to their Medicare patients. There is also  a video for businesses to learn how older relatives of employees and customers can save hundreds to thousands of dollars with a printable handout. The website lists many other resources, such as links to WIC, veteran benefits, and SNAP, to help people with limited income pay for food, housing, and utilities.

The Medicare Drugs Saving website is recommended by the Georgia chapters of the American College of Physicians and American Academy of Family Physicians, the Georgia Council of Aging, the Cobb County Medical Society, and more.

The open enrollment period to change an individual’s Medicare D plan is only open until Dec. 7, with a few exceptions. It is in everyone’s best interest to inform loved ones of this helpful website. Not only will individuals save money; because the state of Georgia helps subsidize more than 304,000 people with low incomes who are on Medicare , this information could potentially save the state and federal governments  $111 million a year. By signing up for the right plan, the 46 million U.S. citizens on Medicare could potentially save the government $16.9 billion a year, which would be split between government agencies that subsidize costs for lower income groups and more affluent people who do not receive such a subsidy.

It is important to realize Medicare has nothing to do with the health exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act.  The website which helps people on Medicare learn to save  money on their insurance is working well  is not affected by the troubles on the  website people use to find a insurance plan under ObamaCare.

For more information and to visit this website, go to www.MedicareDrugSavings.org.

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