From milkshakes to spirits


As of this writing, Underground Atlanta is, for the most part, closed to Atlantans. Cautious optimism is the order of the day as Atlantans concerned about this valuable section of Atlanta’s history await its next incarnation. Perhaps, while you wait, you should consider visiting another of Atlanta’s historic gems, the Michael C. Carlos Museum on the Emory University campus. And if you are wondering what a fabulous collection of ancient antiquities has to do with a shabby, too often neglected section of Atlanta’s past, you probably by now have figured out that the answer can be found in this week’s Stories of Atlanta.

Lance Russell is an Atlanta-based filmmaker and media communicator who, for over three decades, has been entrusted by clients to tell their stories. A seasoned producer with an innate ability to cut to the heart of the matter, Lance’s instincts are tailor-made for today’s “media bite” culture. Brief, poignant and always entertaining, Lance’s current passion is bringing Atlanta’s colorful and inspiring past to life with his “rest of the story” style video series, Stories of Atlanta. “History’s best communicators,” says Lance, “have always been storytellers. It’s in our DNA. ‘Once upon a time’ is how we got to where we are now.”

2 replies
  1. Deborah Belyeu says:

    Oh, how I loved this one, and learned something new! My dad actually worked for the candy company (is it Brach or Brock?) when he was very young (he’d be 104 now), and the teeny, original museum in the basement of Emory (that Michael C. Carlos expanded upon so brilliantly) catapulted an eight-year-old girl into another world in 1966. Our amazing teacher, Mrs. Vosyka, took her third grade class at Grace Christian School (Memorial Drive) on a field trip, and I was forever changed. Someone had to come back and get me, because I’d fallen victim to total enchantment with a mummy encased in glass. My first, first-hand experience with antiquity. Thank you for tying Atlanta’s information tidbits and locations together.Report

    Reply
  2. Greg Hodges says:

    I too went with my grade school class from the city’s southside to visit “the mummies” at Emory……probably around 1960/61 or so. Somewhere around here in a dusty box is a small grainy black and white snapshot of a mummy lying in its glass case. The museum (and Emory) have come a long way since then.Report

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