Give the gift of the Atlanta BeltLine, urges BeltLine’s non-profit fundraising arm

By David Pendered

The Atlanta BeltLine Partnership, Inc. has a few ideas for gifts to give during the holiday season, ranging in price from $5 for a set of postcards to $5,000 for a membership in the Founders Circle in the elite status of Bridgebuilder.

BeltLine Bears

‘BeltLine Bears’ is one of 10 images in a postcard set that features images including art installations, iconic locations, and activities located along the Atlanta BeltLine. Credit: shop.beltline.org

The partnership has issued a simple statement to inform folks that the non-profit organization that’s helping to establish the BeltLine is an option for gift-giving:

  • “Do you believe in the BeltLine? This holiday season, we’d like to share a few fun ways to show the BeltLine some love. There’s lots to give and get, and every dollar you invest brings 45 neighborhoods one step closer to realizing the Atlanta BeltLine vision!”

The partnership emphasizes the gift of membership as a support. Prices start at $45 and rise incrementally to $5,000, over the course of seven categories. All these memberships provide access to the Supporter Perks Program, which provides discounts from more than 60 participating businesses for an array of goods and services.

The value of the membership awards rises in accord with the donation level. The $45 Trekker level receives, “special communications about supporter events and activities.” The next level, the $125 Explorer level, receives the communications package plus a BeltLine trail map (priced at $16 at the BeltLine Shop) and a BeltLine T-shirt or hat ($22 for the shirt; the shop’s website doesn’t appear to list a hat).

The $5,000 Bridgebuilder receives all the items awarded to the lower level of donations, plus a private bus tour of the BeltLine for 30 guests, and tickets to all the exclusive Founders Circle events.

Atlanta BeltLine, hoodie

The ‘eco gray’ hoodie is priced at $38 and was designed and printed by the Ice Box, located on the Eastside Trail and the first company to join the Made on the BeltLine campaign. Credit: shop.beltline.org

In addition to the memberships, the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership encourages monthly donations. For a minimum donation of $10 a month, the donor is to receive a canvas bag emblazoned with the words, “I believe in the Atlanta BeltLine 22/45.” The numbers refer to the planned 22-mile long BeltLine that’s to connect 45 neighborhoods.

And there’s the BeltLine shop, located in the Atlanta BeltLine Center, at 112 Krog St., Suite 14, Atlanta. All items are 20 percent off through Dec. 31 and the merchandise includes, “tote bags, T-shirts, hoodies, hats, water bottles, fit kits, coasters, maps, and more!”

The partnership was incorporated in 2004 to facilitate fund-raising for projects related to the BeltLine. It’s a 501 (c) (3) corporation under the federal tax code, which makes contributions eligible for tax deductions, though deductions for some households may have been affected by the Tax Cut and Jobs Act President Trump signed a year ago.

According to the partnership’s self description, it:

  • “[H]elps keep the Atlanta BeltLine vision on track by enabling the construction of more parks and trails; engaging the public through tours, health and fitness programs, and special events; and empowering Atlanta BeltLine residents to connect with jobs, housing, and economic development.”

These activities cost money. The partnership has raised more than $59 million over the course of its lifetime, according to its 2017 Annual Report.

The partnership has faced wide swings in revenue in recent years, according to its federal tax returns posted by guidestar.com. The returns signed on the following dates show the following revenues:

 

Atlanta BeltLine, trail map

Priced at $16, the Atlanta BeltLine trail map is a full-color poster that measure 24 by 36 inches. Credit: shop.beltline.org

 

David Pendered, Managing Editor, is an Atlanta journalist with more than 30 years experience reporting on the region’s urban affairs, from Atlanta City Hall to the state Capitol. Since 2008, he has written for print and digital publications, and advised on media and governmental affairs. Previously, he spent more than 26 years with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and won awards for his coverage of schools and urban development. David graduated from North Carolina State University and was a Western Knight Center Fellow. David was born in Pennsylvania, grew up in North Carolina and is married to a fifth-generation Atlantan.

1 reply
  1. Avatar
    Rob Brawner says:

    Thank you, David, for sharing information with your readers about ways they can support the Atlanta BeltLine through the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership. One point of clarification – as a result of changing our fiscal year, the May 15th, 2017 filing was for only a six month period, whereas the other two filings covered 12-month periods. Once again – thank you for the article. Rob Brawner, Executive Director, Atlanta BeltLine PartnershipReport

    Reply

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