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Atlanta Civic Circle Democracy

Minority undercount in census will likely lead to lower political representation, big federal funding losses

The federal census shows Georgia is more ethnically and racially diverse than a decade ago. (Photo by Enayet Raheem on Unsplash)

The U.S. Census Bureau undercounted Blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans for the 2020 census, new government data shows – an omission likely to affect political representation and federal funding for minority communities for years to come.

The national population count every 10 years is used to draw legislative maps for both state and federal elected offices in all 50 states. It’s also used to allocate $1.5 trillion in federal money for everything from public housing to healthcare to road construction.

The census has been overcounting whites and Asians for decades while undercounting people of color. But the trend was noticeably magnified for the 2020 census, according to a  Census Bureau report released this month. The minority undercount was “larger in magnitude” than for 2010, according to the Census Bureau’s Post-Enumeration Survey, performed to assess the national headcount’s accuracy.

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2 Comments

  1. Robert Dinwiddie April 1, 2022 2:20 pm

    If they know they were undercounted, someone must have counted them, right?Report

    Reply
  2. Devin May 24, 2022 10:06 pm

    The national population count every 10 years is used to draw legislative maps for both state and federal elected offices in all 50 states.
    cookie clickerReport

    Reply

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