The 1st great scholar of black life in America, he was an author, an activist and an Atlantan

W.E.B. DuBois was born in 1868 on the heels of the Civil War and by 1963, when he passed away, he had left behind a lifetime of accomplishment and dedication that forestalled any doubt about his sincerity and his passion.

He wore many hats during his 95 years: educator, sociologist, writer, poet and scholar but he, no doubt, will best be remembered as a tireless activist for social justice. In 1909 he was among the founders of the NAACP and, for 24 years, served as its director of publicity and research.

He was, to be sure, a radical activist. As editor of the NAACP’s monthly magazine Crisis, DuBois’ biography on that organization’s web site describes him as having, “…directed a constant stream of agitation—often bitter and sarcastic—at white Americans while serving as a source of information and pride to African Americans.”

As with all of the Stories of Atlanta, there is, in W.E.B. DuBois, an Atlanta connections.

Lance Russell is an Atlanta-based filmmaker and media communicator who, for over three decades, has been entrusted by clients to tell their stories. A seasoned producer with an innate ability to cut to the heart of the matter, Lance’s instincts are tailor-made for today’s “media bite” culture. Brief, poignant and always entertaining, Lance’s current passion is bringing Atlanta’s colorful and inspiring past to life with his “rest of the story” style video series, Stories of Atlanta. “History’s best communicators,” says Lance, “have always been storytellers. It’s in our DNA. ‘Once upon a time’ is how we got to where we are now.”

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