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People, Places & Parks Thought Leadership

In a year like no other, nature was a hero

By Deron Davis, Executive Director, The Nature Conservancy in Georgia

The last year challenged us all to reevaluate our priorities and find new ways of getting things done. That’s certainly true for The Nature Conservancy in Georgia, and I’m amazed at what our teams and partnerships accomplished.

Through the creativity of our science-driven staff working in communities from north to south, the people and nature of Georgia are enjoying the benefits of our commitment to conservation.

  • With permanent funding from the Army at Fort Benning, we enhanced the sustainability of our 35,000+ acre Chattahoochee Fall Line program near Columbus, a landscape of native wildlife and plant communities.
  • We expanded the 18,000-acre Broxton Rocks Conservation Area in Coffee County with the purchase of 1,000+ acres that feature a high diversity of plants and provide habitat for a variety of animal species. One generous donor provided full project funding, including stewardship funds that will provide opportunities for fire crews, interns and others to train, work on, study and learn from this property.
  • TNC has made it a goal to protect, manage and restore longleaf pine forests across the Southeast. In Georgia, we planted 683,860 longleaf pine trees, and because fire is a natural part of the longleaf landscape, we burned a record number of acres: 58,269. Thanks to our work co-managing the longleaf pine forests of the Moody Forest Nature Preserve in Appling County, this year our experts observed 17 fledgling endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers there.

These are just a few examples of the impact we achieved in Georgia with the support of our community partners and generous donors. See our full IMPACT REPORT here.

This is the decade to deliver. Actions like these will define our state’s path over the next century. The Nature Conservancy is taking on the dual threats of accelerated climate change and unprecedented biodiversity loss. By letting science guide our focus and equity guide our execution, we can shape a better future for people and our planet. I hope YOU will join us.

This is sponsored content.

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