‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’ – a crowd-pleasing tale of Charles Dickens

Genial and inviting, “The Man Who Invented Christmas” has the same sort of old-fashioned appeal as Coca Cola’s iconic Santa Claus.

But this isn’t a story about Santa or the historical Saint Nicholas or even Clement Clark Moore, whose ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas” filled our heads with sugar plums and eight tiny reindeer.

According to director Bharat Nalluri and writer Susan Coyne, the man who transformed Christmas from a minor holiday to a major phenomenon was none other than Charles Dickens.  And he did it by writing his immortal tale, “A Christmas Carol.”

Mayoral candidates start Thanksgiving week with endorsements, taxes

On a cold Monday in Atlanta, the mayor’s race is getting hotter: Keisha Lance Bottoms started the day with official endorsements from some Atlanta Democrat heavyweights. In the afternoon, Mary Norwood released her several years of her tax records and challenged Bottoms to do the same.

And in between, the two both took turns with their late-campaign stump speeches and answering questions at a gathering of perhaps two dozen clients and staff of the Downtown branch of Dentons, the international legal and lobbying mega-shop.

From the Great War to the Greatest Generation: Georgia schools and the home front

This week, MIKE SANTROCK, of the Fulton County Schools Archives, tells how military training arrived in Atlanta’s schools.

On the morning of May 23, 1918, superintendent of Fulton County schools J. W. Simmons sat at a desk in a downtown Atlanta courthouse. He, like most other Americans that spring, had been following news from the war front in Europe. It was hard to believe that a country, which had once been so divided over whether or not it should send troops to fight in a European conflict, was now rallying behind the war effort as if democracy itself depended on a victory.

It’s all in how you deliver the message

They say that when you die, whether you’re going to heaven or hell, you have to go through Atlanta first. Though made popular by Atlanta’s very busy airport, that saying actually originated back in the day when Atlanta was a major railroad junction. At its peak, over 300 trains a day came and went through Atlanta and, for a while, it seemed that train travel was the wave of the future. That is until the Wright Brothers made their famous flight in 1903 and from that moment on, everything changed.

Of course, Atlantans didn’t embrace air travel overnight.

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25 and done by Kelly Jordan

Click each photo to enlarge

Atlanta – save Gaines Hall – a building too important to die

It’s been more than two years since historic Gaines Hall caught on fire – and little has been done to save one of the oldest and most significant buildings in Atlanta.

Gaines Hall continues to deteriorate in front of our eyes – a victim of the natural elements as well as inadequate fire insurance coverage. The building also has been in the middle of a hotly contested legal battle between the  City of Atlanta’s Invest Atlanta and Clark Atlanta University over who owns land that used to belong to Morris Brown College.

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The Loudermilks bring their business back to their former home in Buckhead

As published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on October 27, 2017

Charlie and Robin Loudermilk have come home.

The father and son have moved their business offices back into the building where they worked for decades.

Built in 1963, the office tower at 309 East Paces Ferry Road was the first high-rise in Buckhead. Charlie Loudermilk bought it in 1970 and for more than 40 years it served as the headquarters for Aaron’s Inc., the furniture and electronics rental company he had founded in 1955. Aaron’s used it as its home base until a couple of years ago, when the company moved to a new headquarters at 400 Galleria Parkway.