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The future of Metro Atlanta transit is pending on Gwinnett County

By King Williams Gwinnett County, the soon-to-be-largest county in Georgia by population, is the state’s most diverse county – representing a microcosm of what the future of American politics and economic development could look like. Gwinnett currently is a majority-minority county, meaning that no racial or ethnic group dominates its population. Gwinnett’s county-level leadership on […]

Old Fourth Ward, construction

Atlanta’s gentrification, now a challenge, started as sign of city’s spirit of civil rights

By Guest Columnist HATTIE DORSEY, civic volunteer, founder and retired president of the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership

Gentrification is a word used to describe what happens with housing development patterns in cities, particularly in the North, Midwest and West Coast cities, when neighborhoods change by race and by income. It was not a pattern that happened in the South, because housing in this region was segregated by race even years after the civil rights movement.

Officially or not, MARTA and Gwinnett have a long history

When I worked as a reporter for the Atlanta Journal back the mid-‘70s, I would rise before dawn to catch a MARTA bus at the corner of North Decatur Road and Scott Boulevard, along with a crowd of commuters who drove every day from Lilburn and Lawrenceville, parked in the North DeKalb Mall lot and made the second leg of their commute by public transit. I recall those days to make the point that however the referendum turns out March 19, commuters from Gwinnett County have been riding MARTA for a long time, and over the years, forking over a share of the sales taxes that support it at Atlanta lunch counters and stores.

Stacey Abrams Brian Kemp

When no one agrees what “winning” is, victory becomes a matter of opinion

We live in an age when people want to play the same old games, but they can’t agree on the same set of rules. It’s a world where blurred boundaries and shifting alliances make it hard to tell at times who’s won or lost, instead producing dual, asymmetrical victors. Pepsi and Coke, Brian and Stacey, Donald and Nancy, Maroon 5 and Big Boi, AOL and Mitch: winners all, depending who you ask.