Posts

Peace Monument, piedmont park

Confederate icons to come down in Atlanta, pending support from city council, mayor

In the most personal of moments, Brenda Muhammad on Monday asked her fellow panelists permission to read aloud a motion calling for the removal of the names Confederate Avenue and East Confederate Avenue from the city’s streets. The two Confederate icons are among several that are to come down, according to recommendations that are headed to the Atlanta City Council and Mayor Kasim Reed.

aps pupils

Atlanta’s public policymakers must put children first

By Guest Columnist MERIA CARSTARPHEN, superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools

Atlanta – as the birthplace of a King, the crucible of the Civil Rights Movement and the international gateway to the Southeastern United States – is a city of innovation and spirit. Yet it is also a city entrenched in inequities that prevent children from living the choice-filled lives they deserve.

Georgia's export trade partner

Georgia voices vie for attention during NAFTA talks

The NAFTA talks slated to conclude Monday have transpired as an array of Georgia voices have sought to be heard: The Georgia Chamber of Commerce and five local chambers; small farmers seeking protection from competitors based in the U.S. and Mexico; and Sonny Perdue, a former Georgia governor now serving as U.S. agriculture secre

Orthodoxy is the easy way in early governor’s race forums

Over the past week or so both the Democratic and Republican candidates for governor have met to air their differences, and it should come as a surprise to no one that they don’t have many.

Sure, the two Staceys jabbed at each other over a couple of points and all the Republican challengers accused their better known rivals of being career politicians, But the overriding impression from this first pair of encounters is that both parties have grown settled in their respective orthodoxies, with very little way for candidates to break new ground.

BeltLine, Eastside Trail

Atlanta’s housing policies must be well-funded, comprehensive, inclusive

By Guest Columnist DAN IMMERGLUCK, a professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University

In the book, City on the Verge, author Mark Pendergrast points out some of the challenges that the Atlanta BeltLine and the rest of Atlanta face in terms of housing affordability. He argues, for example, that the City should adopt mandatory inclusionary zoning, with a sliding scale to address the truly impoverished, as soon as possible in order to address the problem of declining affordability.