Posts

Irma, River Street

Georgia urgently needs a coastal hazard study and plan

By Guest Columnist DAVID KYLER, executive director of the Center for a Sustainable Coast, located in St. Simons

Enormous burdens on Georgia taxpayers have been imposed by damage from major storms over the past two years. Such impacts over this period are estimated to have cost Georgians some $5 billion in property and infrastructure damage, evacuation expenses, and recovery/clean-up. The majority of these expenses have been imposed by hurricanes, Matthew (2016) and Irma (2017).

hartsfield airport

Potential state takeover of Atlanta’s airport among issues raising concerns at City Hall

Three measures approved by the state Legislature this year are triggering concerns among members of the Atlanta City Council – a study committee to evaluate the state takeover of Atlanta’s airport; a call for Atlanta to permanently close a portion of Mitchell Street adjacent to the Capitol; and carving out a piece of Stockbridge to create a City of Eagle’s Landing.

Plant Vogtle, October 2017

More than a financial burden, Plant Vogtle a bad business decision for Georgia

By Guest Columnist MICHAEL M. SIZEMORE, founding principal of Sizemore Group and a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects

What makes a good business decision? After running a successful architecture firm for decades, I’ve learned a thing or two about what guides good business judgment, and the importance of making sound decisions in the best interest of one’s clients….

And that is why I can say with confidence that the decision to continue the Plant Vogtle nuclear expansion, despite a near doubling of its original price tag and more than five years of delay, appears to be bad business, pure and simple.

amli, arts center, affordable housing

Dearth of affordable housing calls for comprehensive solution

By Guest Columnist KATHLEEN FARRELL, head of commercial real estate at SunTrust Banks, Inc.

Over the last decade, as millennials entered the workforce and delayed or indefinitely avoided buying a home, apartment complexes sprang up across Atlanta – as they did in many U.S. cities – to meet the growing demand for rental housing. Many of these new developments were built as luxury living experiences in order to command higher rents and meet the expectations of a younger clientele. The result was a robust supply of high-end units that have been absorbed by Atlanta’s strong job market, but a dearth of affordable, workforce housing.