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Georgians, state treasury to suffer under President Trump’s budget plan

By Guest Columnist TAIFA BUTLER, executive director of the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

Georgians can find a lot not to like in the federal budget President Trump is proposing. It jeopardizes the state’s financial stability. It promises to hurt the ability of millions of Georgians to meet basic living standards. Even Social Security disability benefits are slashed in the planned budget cuts.

The pitcher and the poet

This week guest contributor RANDY HENDRICKS, a University of West Georgia English professor, considers how friendship and place shape us.

Kent Greenfield and Robert Penn Warren were friends, best friends in boyhood but also friends for life. They were born three years apart in Guthrie, Kentucky. Greenfield had a six-year career in the major leagues as a right-handed pitcher, debuting in 1924 with John McGraw’s New York Giants. Warren distinguished himself not only as a poet but as a novelist, perhaps best known for his 1946 Pulitzer Prize winning novel “All the King’s Men.” How does little Guthrie give birth to two such prodigies at the same time?

Would his mother be proud?

Cities always like to put their best foot forward. Atlanta is no exception. There is a long history in “The City Too Busy To Hate” of boosterism. Some might even say Atlantans have been guilty of going overboard when touting the city’s achievements and capabilities. On occasion, that may have been true but, then again, […]

paris can wait

‘Paris Can Wait’ – Eleanor Coppola’s feature debut loses its way

A movie has to be pretty bad to make Diane Lane look bad.

Alas, “Paris Can Wait” is that movie.

Lane plays Anne, a chicly dressed accessory (read, wife) to power-player filmmaker, Michael (Alec Baldwin). He’s not a monster (well, not by Hollywood standards). Sure, he plays around and generally treats her more like a personal assistant than a wife (Where are my socks? Where are my pills?)). But at least he’s semi-conscious of the inequity and, in his way, values her.

MLK’s “Beloved Community” and the G-Word

An almost surefire way to start an argument in Atlanta is to utter the “G-word” – as in “gentrification.” In the midst of a torrid development boom, the inflow of affluent newcomers to Atlanta – and the involuntary uprooting of low-income residents that inevitably follows – reveals the racial and economic fault lines running through city’s social bedrock.

Latest Reports


Latest Reports

  • Settlement reached to close Peachtree-Pine homeless shelter – ending more than a decade of discord

    Settlement reached to close Peachtree-Pine homeless shelter – ending more than a decade of discord

    After nearly a decade legal battles between various parties, a settlement has been reached that will lead to the closing of the Peachtree-Pine homeless shelter, according to several sources close to the transaction. Fulton County Superior Court Judge Craig Schwall apparently signed a consent decree on Wednesday, but different parties did not want to discuss the settlement on the record until they had seen the signed agreementRead More »
  • Proposed efforts to combat heroin, opiate use delayed for review by Fulton commissioners

    Proposed efforts to combat heroin, opiate use delayed for review by Fulton commissioners

    Fulton County’s board of commissioners voted Wednesday to further refine its planned assault on the usage of opiates and heroin. The board voted unanimously to hold two items pending review – a proposed opiate abuse plan and a proposed $40,000 study recommended by Fulton District Attorney Paul Howard.Read More »
  • MARTA aims for better transit experience through art

    MARTA aims for better transit experience through art

    When Jenn Cornell cranked up her cello at the top of the Northbound train escalator at MARTA’s Five Points Station Monday afternoon, maybe a dozen or so passengers gathered round to watch or listen or take videos. Atlanta transit riders can expect more moments worth stopping for – be it music, dance, painting or other art – as the transit system kicks off a reinvigorated arts program.Read More »
  • United Way’s Milton Little to take a three-month sabbatical

    United Way’s Milton Little to take a three-month sabbatical

    Following the cue of several of his colleagues, Milton Little, president and CEO of the United Way of Greater Atlanta, will be taking a three-month sabbatical starting June 21. Little said he will use the time to do some traveling, perhaps overseas; help his 18-year-old son prepare to enter his freshman year at Howard University; and spend “a lot of time reflecting and planning for the United Way of the next 10 years.”Read More »
  • Tom Teepen (1935 to 2017) – a man ahead of his time

    Tom Teepen (1935 to 2017) – a man ahead of his time

    Friends, colleagues and family gathered at the Mason Art Gallery Sunday afternoon to remember one of Atlanta’s unapologetic liberals – Tom Teepen. Teepen, editorial page editor of the Dayton Daily News, became an Atlantan when he joined the Atlanta Constitution’s editorial page in 1982, soon becoming its editor. He later served as a syndicated political columnist for Cox Enterprises until he retired in 2002.Read More »
  • Atlanta to honor amputee who rolled his wheelchair to Chicago to draw attention to gun violence

    Atlanta to honor amputee who rolled his wheelchair to Chicago to draw attention to gun violence

    The Atlanta City Council on Monday is slated to honor an Atlanta native who propelled himself in a wheelchair from Atlanta to Chicago to draw attention to gun violence. The man’s legs were amputated after he was wounded in a shotgun attack in what was then a crime infested public housing complex.Read More »

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