Columnists


Bullard and his French Foreign Legion comrades during World War I

Eugene Bullard: boxer, soldier, fighter pilot, spy, and elevator operator

This week guest columnist CHRIS DOBBS, editorial assistant for the New Georgia Encyclopedia, shares the story of Eugene Bullard, son of a former slave, and the first black fighter pilot.

Eugene Bullard was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1895. As an expatriate in France, he became a boxer, soldier, fighter pilot, business owner, and spy. During his final years, in the United States, he was an elevator operator. Bullard’s story is particularly engaging. He was obviously a tight spring of potential as a boy, and it’s fascinating to see how high he flew as soon as the environment around him allowed it. The difference between his life in the United States and his life in Europe lends his life its striking cinematic scale.

A favorite event of voters is to ignore a special election. So it’s no surprise the recent election for state House District 58 barely registered in the hearts and minds of the electorate.

Every election matters: Go vote

A favorite event of voters is to ignore a special election. So it’s no surprise the recent election for state House District 58 barely registered in the hearts and minds of the electorate.

A January three-way race generated a measly 2.78 percent turnout. In a district of 30,162 voters, only 838 took a few minutes out of their day to cast a ballot, excluding provisional ballots – if any.

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  • Commentary: Citizens Trust moving, but continuing mission

    Commentary: Citizens Trust moving, but continuing mission

    Original Story on WABE by Maria Saporta http://cpa.ds.npr.org/wabe/audio/2016/02/CitizensTrust.mp3 Citizens Trust has been a fixture on Auburn Avenue for decades, but it will soon call Peachtree Street home. The bank was known for lending money to African-Americans who couldn’t borrow money from white-owned banks. And in the 1960s Auburn Avenue was called “the richest Negro street […]

Column: College Football Hall of Fame CEO search takes unexpected turn

By Maria Saporta
As published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on February 5, 2016

John Christie, interim CEO of the College Football Hall of Fame who was considered to have the inside track to the permanent job, has taken his name out of the running.

Christie has been the longest-serving executive at the Hall, starting with the project five-and-a-half years ago. He was the Hall’s chief operating officer when John Stephenson Jr. was the CEO. When Stephenson joined Chick-fil-A, Christie was a natural candidate for the top job.

But then Christie had an epiphany in mid-December, and he realized that he didn’t have as much passion running the hall day-to-day as he did during the challenging five years it took to develop and open the Hall.