bumble bee

Columnists


Cranes delivered, Savannah port

Atlanta, Georgia likely to feel brunt of Trump’s anti-trade policies

From its inception, Atlanta has been a hub of transportation, commerce and communication.

Those factors have made Atlanta a center of global commerce – a role that has been boosted by having the world’s busiest airport and one of the world’s largest airlines.

Georgia also is a leader in global commerce and trade – and its presence is growing because of the state’s investment in its Port of Savannah, one of the fastest growing seaports in the country. The state also has numerous international offices established to promote the exports of Georgia products, as diverse as agriculture, poultry and professional services.

North Atlanta High School, campus

GSU report examines popular ESPLOST as U.S. education secretary mulls school funding

When voters in Atlanta, and Fulton and DeKalb counties, approved a 1 percent sales tax for education last year, they fell squarely within the group of affluent Georgia communities that like what the tax provides – interest-free, pay-as-you-go financing for capital expenses. A new report from Georgia State University outlines challenges that face less affluent communities.

bumble bee

Tips on how to garden sustainably

By Guest Columnist SUSAN VARLAMOFF, the former director of the University of Georgia’s Office of Environmental Sciences in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and lifetime Master Gardener

Landscapes occupy vast swaths of land across urban and suburban areas in the U.S. and how we cultivate our gardens directly affects the surrounding environment. Since Atlanta is bisected by the Chattahoochee River, which serves as a drinking water source, runoff from the land directly impacts the river’s water quality. Misuse or overuse of fertilizers and pesticides can result in water contamination as these chemicals run off the land during rain events.

Southern Writers Onstage

The voice of the individual

This week, PEARL MCHANEY, of Georgia State University, encourages readers to listen for the voice of truth in the arts and humanities.

By Pearl McHaney

At the height of the Cold War, 1954, American fiction writer Eudora Welty found herself in Cambridge, England, speaking at an American Studies conference:

Mutual understanding in the world being nearly always, as now, at low ebb, it is comforting to remember that it is through art that one country can nearly always speak reliably to another, if the other can hear at all. Art, though, is never the voice of a country; it is an even more precious thing, the voice of the individual, doing its best to speak, not comfort of any sort, indeed, but truth.

091_First-Delivered-Letter

In hindsight, it seems obvious

Part of the fun in looking back through time is examining the origins of the things that today we take for granted. Even though it is obvious that there clearly had to be a first for just about everything, that doesn’t make it any less interesting to find out just exactly how a particular “first” went down. So, once again, we pause to consider just exactly who was the first and what had to happen to make it that way in this week’s Stories of Atlanta.

Cannabis Oils

A mother’s love vs. Georgia’s “reefer madness”

Bridgett Liquori is an outlaw, not that you’d know from looking at her. This petite 34-year-old single mother’s crime? She loves her children and is risking everything to keep them as happy, safe and healthy as possible.

If that means breaking state and federal laws to get the medical cannabis her kids need to treat their daunting illnesses, then so be it.

Latest Reports


Latest Reports

WABE

  • Four civic giants work to improve Metro Atlanta education

    Four civic giants work to improve Metro Atlanta education

    Four regional organizations – the Metro Atlanta Chamber, the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC), the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta and the United Way of Greater Atlanta – are collaborating on an educational effort called Learn4Life. The goal is to bring the eight public school systems in Cobb, Gwinnett, Fulton, DeKalb and Clayton counties to improve public education in the region.