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Exit Interview: Gov. Deal leaving office with “a lot to be proud of”

As published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on Jan. 4, 2019

When Nathan Deal took the oath of office as Georgia’s 82nd governor on a snowy day in January 2011, the Great Recession had swollen the Peach State’s unemployment rate to 10.4 percent.

The state government’s “rainy-day” fund, reserves to use in case of emergency, was down to a dangerously low $116 million.

An open letter to Georgia Gov.-elect Brian Kemp

As you prepare to step into the governor’s office, you stand at a crossroads.

Will you be a governor who  embodies the image you presented during the primaries – a gun-toting, anti-immigration, pro-religious liberty leader who divides our state?

Or will you be a unifying force who appeals to Georgia’s demographic diversity, its rural and urban areas as well as someone who will nurture economic development in all corners of the state?

Construction costs skyrocket, niches remain – such as Houston’s site near Lenox Mall

The site of a former Houston’s restaurant, across Lenox Road from the mall, is just the type of property that could accommodate a trophy asset the current and near-future economy could support. This comes at a time a new report from CBRE suggests some potential commercial developments may not make much economic sense because of skyrocketing construction costs in metro Atlanta.

He called it the way he saw it

The old saying “a penny for your thoughts” is, by current standards, too expensive. We are living in a era where seemingly everyone is “on the record” about…everything. We blog, vlog, tweet and post about whatever thought enters our head. In the opinion of some, we’ve gone a little too far in sharing our pontifications. […]

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Cloudy by Kelly Jordan

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Love Local – Food Well Alliance at old State Farmers Market by Kelly Jordan

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Unlocking potential: How mentoring changes metro Atlanta

By Guest Columnist KWAME JOHNSON, president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta.

One of the more under-utilized resources in metro Atlanta is the potential of our young people.

In Atlanta, more than many other large cities, your ZIP code determines your life trajectory. A 2018 study from Harvard University’s Opportunity Insights showed that Atlanta and Charlotte have the lowest rates of upward mobility for children who grow up in those cities, despite very high rates of job and wage growth over the past two decades.