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Securing Atlanta's Future Thought Leadership

Join the Nearly 2/3 of Women Voters Eager to Make Their Voices Heard at the Polls

Metro Atlanta women at the 9th annual YWCA Conversations forum My Body. My Health. My Rights.

By Sharmen M. Gowens, CEO, YWCA of Greater Atlanta

More than a century since the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution passed, giving women the right to vote, women still have concerns about economic security, violence and health care in daily life. The women of Georgia say these issues are top of mind, and they plan to take their concerns to the polls this election.

YWCA’s 5th national YWomenVote survey examines the priorities and concerns of 3,354 adult women across America. Not surprisingly, the recent survey reveals deep anxiety about a broad range of economic, caregiving, safety, health, and societal concerns. Most alarming, many of these concerns have grown significantly – just since January. 

Economic issues are top of mind for Georgia women, with 67% saying they are “very worried” about the cost of living and inflation. 50% say they are very worried their family won’t be able to pay the bills, and 47% say the same about affording rent or mortgages. 51% of Georgia women are also “very worried” about gun violence; one-third say the same about the legal status of reproductive health services and access to mental health services.

Not surprising, Georgia women are eager to make their voices heard at the polls. 

The survey also reflects that women are remarkably united — across perceived differences of race, ethnicity, party identification, and socioeconomic and disability status — in supporting policy solutions that address their concerns and needs for themselves and their families.   

Our polling finds that younger women and Hispanic women, who are too often left out of policy discussions, feel the urgency to vote this year. Georgia BIPOC (Black Indigenous People of Color) women, in particular, are very engaged, with 67% rating themselves as at least somewhat enthusiastic, including 69% of GenZ women of color and 56% of Millennials of color. 

Similarly, in the recent September 28th CONVERSATIONS forum My Body. My Health. My Rights. held by YWCA of Greater Atlanta, women across all age groups discussed voting concerns. Following exchanges on Reproductive Justice, these women expressed feeling empowered to engage in thoughtful conversations with family, friends, and community to help ensure their rights, and the rights of others, are protected.

As history has shown and this YWCA YWomenVote survey reinforces, the voices of young women and young women of color in particular, are compelling. They are shouldering economic uncertainty, threats to their bodily autonomy, racial violence, mass shootings, a national mental health crisis, and the COVID-19 pandemic. These lived experiences are profound, and so, too, is their vision and demand for change. 

At YWCA of Greater Atlanta, we believe that if we are to create a world where all young women are recognized and valued as the equal, powerful, and unstoppable leaders they indeed are, we must all turn out to vote this year like our lives, futures, and rightsand theirsdepend on it.  

Can we count on you to help get women to the polls?

Survey Methodology

The 5th Annual YWomenVote survey was administered by researchers from Finn Partners and reached 3,354 adult women across ethnicities and other relevant demographics.

About YWCA of Greater Atlanta

YWCA OF GREATER ATLANTA IS A LOCAL CHAPTER OF YWCA USA and has been a voice for change for women and families in Georgia since its founding on the campus of Spelman College in 1902. Our organization’s foundation is built upon a history of mobilizing diverse groups of women leaders to identify community problems and advocate for solutions. Visit us at www.ywcaatlanta.org for more information.

 

This is sponsored content.

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