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jordan hall, mlk door

Demolition of Jordan Hall another sign of Atlanta’s dereliction of historic buildings

By Guest Columnist JAY SCOTT, a principal at Green Rock Partners, an Atlanta-based firm specializing in urban design, landscape architecture and planning

The Metro Atlanta YMCA is about to destroy a significant part of civil rights history in the African American Community, historic Jordan Hall. They are not doing it alone.

Their primary partners are the Woodruff Foundations and Invest Atlanta, who have given more than half of the $20 million necessary.

Pittsburgh, tale of two cities

Proposal to use Atlanta’s surplus property for affordable housing hits snag at City Hall

The idea sounds simple enough – provide Atlanta’s surplus property for use as construction sites for housing that’s affordable for a schoolteacher. Pending legislation to do just that uncorked a wide-reaching debate Tuesday among members of the Atlanta City Council over the city’s past and present efforts to promote a range of housing prices in the city.

kwanz

Mayor Reed and key city council folks are at odds over closing Eastside TAD

Invest Atlanta provided financing to a record number of developments at its board meeting July 21 – projects that will add a total of 493 units of affordable and workforce housing – a top priority of Mayor Kasim Reed.

But a reason there was such a rush of projects was due to the possible closing of the Eastside TAD (Tax Allocation District). And Mayor Kasim Reed supports closing the TAD.

busy bee cafe, exterior

To revitalize Atlanta, let’s incorporate local black business, economic communities

By Guest Columnist JOSEPH R. HUDSON, chair of the Economic Development Committee of the Atlanta branch of the NAACP

We pride ourselves on being “a city too busy to hate” and boast about the leadership class of black individuals who pepper the Atlanta backdrop. However, we refuse to use that same spirit of fact and community to promote the entire city and to utilize more than a few personalities. Should we not recognize a historic black community, its people, businesses, culture, history, and future as important reasons for Atlanta’s overall success as a city?

Irwin Street Market

Affordability an increasingly hot topic amid soaring prices for homes along BeltLine

Note to readers: This is the second of two stories about affordability along the Atlanta BeltLine. Previously: Incentives proposed to preserve affordability of homes, shops …

Price hikes are stunning for homes sold with a half-mile of the Atlanta BeltLine – values rose as much as 58.9 percent in sales recorded between 2011 and 2015. These figures are behind the rising number of civic leaders and candidates for Atlanta City Hall who are talking about affordability, affordability, affordability.

Pittsburgh, tale of two cities

Incentives proposed to preserve affordability of homes, shops along BeltLine

Note to readers: This is the first of two stories about affordability along the Atlanta BeltLine. Coming Monday: Skyrocketing housing prices along BeltLine. // Rising land values along portions of the Atlanta BeltLine have resulted in steep price hikes for existing tenants of homes and businesses, forcing some to relocate. A new proposal aims to preserve the affordability of now-blighted areas as they are redeveloped.

bellwood quarry

As Atlanta seeks rebirth, city must overcome segregationist past cited in new book

Atlanta’s history of government-sanctioned segregated neighborhoods dates to 1922, when the city adopted a zoning law that created separate residential districts for black and white folks, according to a new book by noted researcher Richard Rothstein. The old Techwood Homes and landscape designer Frederick Law Olmstead, Jr. also have segregationist roots, according to Rothstein.