Picturing justice

This week, PAULA LAWTON BEVINGTON, of Atlanta Legal Aid, discusses Atlanta Legal Aid’s Picturing Justice 2017 exhibition and the power of photography to evoke empathy. 

By Paula Lawton Bevington

“A picture is worth a thousand words.”  By the reckoning of that well-worn adage, Atlanta Legal Aid’s decision to mount a photography exhibit last autumn spoke volumes.

Sun shines for 2017 Music Midtown; new city leaders will weigh in on future festivals

Music Midtown 2017 was a nearly fairy-tale event.

The weather was gorgeous (no rain or storms and not too hot) on both Saturday and Sunday. The music was fabulous (at least most of the acts I saw). And, as always, it provided some of the best people-watching in town.

But I kept thinking – what if Music Midtown had happened a week earlier when Hurricane Irma was making its way through Georgia.

A familiar statue

Samuel Spencer was killed at the age of 59. The accident that took his life happened in the predawn hours of Thanksgiving Day in 1878. Spencer and some of his friends were in Spencer’s private rail car headed for a hunting trip in Virginia. While Spencer and his fellow passengers were asleep, his railcar became […]

‘Mother!’ – strong female cast in a long, chaotic movie

Darren Aronofsky certainly needed to get something out of his system… and here it is.

What it is, exactly, I’m not sure.

“Mother!” (yes, the exclamation point is part of the title, like, say, “Oliver!”) takes place in a remote Victorian fixer-upper where Mother (Jennifer Lawrence) does most of the fixer-upping and her husband, Him (Javier Bardem), a world-famous poet, struggles with writer’s block.

Can a BeltLine park provide recreation on, beside, a drinking water reservoir?

By Guest Columnist MARK PENDERGRAST, an Atlanta native and author of ‘City on the Verge: Atlanta and the Fight for America’s Urban Future.’

Does Atlanta have the creative capacity and vision to develop the Westside Park as a true community asset? Will the new lake there be its beloved recreational center? The park is literally the biggest promise of the Atlanta BeltLine.

Metro Atlanta Chamber to emphasize region as hub for ‘Internet of Things’

The Metro Atlanta Chamber today is launching its latest initiative – IoT.ATL – at the GSMA Mobile World Congress meeting this week in San Francisco.

The initiative reflects Atlanta’s dominance in the area known as the Internet of Things (IoT) – the digital connection between items like cars and appliances and the internet. It is also a next generation of the Chamber’s Mobility initiative, which highlighted Atlanta’s strength in mobile communications.

For MARTA’s future, culture is everything

MARTA recently hosted its latest hack-a-thon, a high-tech competition inviting participants to create their own “hacks” or improvements to make the transit agency more effective, efficient and customer friendly. 

Hack-a-thons aren’t new; large companies have been holding them for years. But for MARTA, they’re a really big deal. As the agency starts searching for its next CEO, that person should understand how such events foster a culture of openness and innovation that’s critical to MARTA’s forward trajectory.

Atlanta City Design 2017: A grand vision for people, nature and people in nature

In a  City Hall conference room, Atlanta Planning Commissioner Tim Keane gently unrolled a mega-watercolor that Christian Sottile, an urban designer from Savannah, had painted of the new Atlanta City Design.

The watercolor captured the significance of the design process and its potential for Atlanta by using a graphic style that dates back to the early 1900s – depicting a desire fort this design tol become part of city’s landscape and identity for decades to come.

GPB premieres the landmark documentary The Vietnam War by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick

This week, Mandy Wilson, of Georgia Public Broadcasting, offers a preview of The Vietnam War, the highly anticipated new documentary by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.

By Mandy Wilson

Mandy Wilson
Ken Burns has been hailed as one of the most influential documentary filmmakers of all time, turning millions of people onto history with films like Baseball, Jazz, and The Roosevelts: An Intimate History.
In fact, the late historian and presidential biographer Stephen Ambrose said of his films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.”