Posts

Southface

Atlanta Housing authority to vote on Wednesday on land sale to Southface

The board of the Atlanta Housing authority is looking to sell 1.8 acres of its Civic Center property to Southface Energy Institute, the environmental organization that promotes green building practices in metro Atlanta and Georgia.

According to the posted agenda of its meeting on Oct. 31, the housing authority is seeking “authorization to seek disposition approval” from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and “authorization to consummate the sale” of 1.8 acres of the Civic Center site.

at City Hall on Tuesday, at the announcement of the Civic Center sale closing. Credit: Maggie Lee

Atlanta Housing Authority’s recent actions need further scrutiny

Recent actions by the Atlanta Housing Authority need to be viewed through a magnifying glass.

Despite owning hundreds of acres of land, AHA is spending millions of dollars to buy more land from the City of Atlanta, another public entity.

AHA couches these land deals as helping fulfill its goal to develop more affordable housing in the City of Atlanta. But over the past eight years, AHA has not developed any new housing units on its significant land holdings.

A Civic Center for the 21st century

By Guest Columnist KLAUS VAN DEN BERG, a consultant with CITYperformance

The Atlanta Civic Center, a mega-venue that sports a 4,600-seat auditorium and a separate exhibition hall on a 19-acre site in the Old Fourth Ward, was sold to the Atlanta Housing Authority in late 2017. Former Mayor Kasim Reed, who had already sold significant land parcels to developers, closed the Civic Center deal without requiring the development of a new vision for the site that does justice to its historic significance. The sale itself proceeded mostly outside of public view after the collapse of a deal with a private developer.

Southface

Civic Center sale to AHA places Southface campus on endangered list

For 40 years, Southface has been leading the way in making Atlanta a more sustainable city.

The environmentally-focused nonprofit has been a pioneer in green building practices – and it deserves much of the credit for Atlanta’s national reputation as a city committed to energy and water conservation.

But now Southface is facing its own challenges – likely having to move from its headquarters, now on a .74-acre site along Pine Street near Piedmont, where it has been since 1995.