Atlanta City Design Project to be presented to stakeholders in 410-page book

By David Pendered

Now that the Atlanta City Design Project is nearing completion, Atlanta is making arrangements to present the proposal to stakeholders in a 410-page book that’s to be as expansive as the massive proposal to plan for the city’s next 20 years of anticipated growth and development.

atlanta design project, book

Results of the Atlanta City Design Project are to be presented in a 410-book rich in graphics. Credit: atlantaga.gov

Atlanta’s Department of City Planning has spent the past 18 months designing for Atlanta to be the kind of place current residents want it to be in 2037.

The book, to be completed by Nov. 1, is to relate that vision in a presentation rich with graphics and a design as distinctive as the plan itself, according to the request for proposals the city released July 11.

A pre-proposal conference with prospective bidders was slated for Tuesday at Atlanta City Hall. Bidders got to review the book in its draft form. Proponents have until July 26 to submit their bids.

Ryan Gravel, whose vision for a transit path spurred the creation of the Atlanta BeltLine, has been overseeing the Atlanta City Design Project under the guidance of Atlanta Planning Commissioner Tim Keane. Keane commenced the project soon after taking his position in July 2015. Keane came from Charleston, S.C., where he oversaw planning, preservation and sustainability in that historic and culturally rich city.

Like the BeltLine, the vision for the design project is both inspirational and aspirational.

Gravel’s presentation includes language such as:

atlanta design project, book 1

For the past 18 months, city planners and residents have discussed the future development of the city. Credit: atlantaga.gov

  • “The first premise of the Atlanta City Design is that the city is going to change. That not changing is not an option. That our change will involve significant growth. And that if properly designed, growth can be a powerful tool for shaping the Atlanta we want to become.
  • “The second premise is that almost always, more people are better than fewer. That a diverse population is better than a homogenous one. And that the most strategic scenario for growth includes everyone.”

The Atlanta City Design, if adopted, is to reach into the farthest corners of Atlanta’s future growth. Here’s how the RFP describes the future role of the design project:

  • “The first major milestone of the Atlanta City Design will be 410‐page book that details the City’s identity and values, the project’s urgency and the proposed design for our future City. The Atlanta City Design book will guide other City and agency initiatives such as the Comprehensive Transportation Plan update, future Comprehensive Development Plan updates, affordable housing strategies, etc. The DCP plans to complete the production of the book by November 1st 2017.”

Then the RFP summarizes the project:

atlanta city design, book 2

The Atlanta City Design Project intends to establish a practical road map to shape all aspects of the city’s development over the next 20 years. Credit: atlantaga.gov

  • “The working draft has been produced by the Atlanta City Studio in collaboration with Ryan Gravel and is currently 410 pages in length and rich with graphic content. The DCP wishes to engage a print production company that can offer pre‐production and production services including finishing and binding. The DCP is looking for production process and materials recommendations that ensure quality and distinction for the book. The DCP is specifically looking for creative recommendations that can elevate the current cover design. The DCP has refrained from providing a design for the book wrap to allow creative freedom for the proposing teams.”

The RFP asks bidders to provide proposals for hard cover textbooks, soft cover text books, and book wraps. Quantities include 500 books, 1,000 books and 1,500 books.

Books are to measure 8 inches by 10 inches, have four-color printing, and 51 percent of the pages are full bleed – meaning that when the book is open two pages will present one image or theme.

 

 

David Pendered, Managing Editor, is an Atlanta journalist with more than 30 years experience reporting on the region’s urban affairs, from Atlanta City Hall to the state Capitol. Since 2008, he has written for print and digital publications, and advised on media and governmental affairs. Previously, he spent more than 26 years with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and won awards for his coverage of schools and urban development. David graduated from North Carolina State University and was a Western Knight Center Fellow. David was born in Pennsylvania, grew up in North Carolina and is married to a fifth-generation Atlantan.

5 replies
      • Burroughston Broch says:

        I will open it in 20 years to see what, if any, effect it had. Like most governmental doorstops, predictably none other than to inflate the authors’ egos. I have had experience in preparing like documents that sell by the pound and languish in closed filing cabinets.Report

        Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

What are your thoughts?