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Smart Cities Activity, smart cities

Smart cities for whom? Leveraging technology for an inclusive and just Atlanta

By Guest Columnist ALEX KARNER, formerly of Georgia Tech and now assistant professor in the School of Architecture at The University of Texas at Austin, with JENNIFER HIRSCH, ROBERT ROSENBERGER, and JESSE WOO, of the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Atlanta is one of many cities across the country that is increasingly adopting “smart cities” technologies. These are usually internet-connected sensors that gather data about the environment. Common examples include traffic signals that monitor intersections for accidents, trash cans that alert sanitation workers when they’re full, or air quality monitors that send an alert when pollution levels are unsafe.

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It’s academic by Kelly Jordan

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Planting seeds for Living Building

Seeds planted at the Kendeda Fund’s Living Building launch at Georgia Tech

n lieu of a traditional ground-breaking ceremony, Georgia Tech and the Kendeda Fund planted seeds Thursday to begin construction on what will be the most environmentally sustainable building in the Southeast.

The goal is for the Living Building at Georgia Tech will follow construction guidelines so it will do little to no harm to the environment by using the greenest building materials and by being  a net zero building in terms of energy and water use.

A pressing need to learn about business

Reconstruction was the term given to the period following the Civil War during which the United States set conditions under which the rebellious Southern States would be allowed back into the Union. Coming out of Reconstruction, the City of Atlanta was experiencing growing pains but one of the more positive results of Atlanta’s emergence as an up and coming city was the founding of the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Georgia Tech had been founded in 1885 as part of a plan to build a Southern industrial economy. At its inception, the only degree it offered was one in mechanical engineering but, in the decades to come, other engineering degrees were offered.

Dobbins, cool bus stop

Atlanta’s moment? Convergence of housing people can afford plus access to transit

By Guest Columnist MIKE DOBBINS, professor of the practice of planning at Georgia Tech’s College of Architecture and a former commissioner of planning and community development for the City of Atlanta

Against the backdrop of an antagonistic and often toxic campaign season, two opportunities are emerging that could begin to lift Atlanta out of its wealth gap, the city’s own divisive and persistent stain.