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Task Force for Global Health

Decatur-based coalition gets $29.97 million boost from Gates Foundation

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has done it again.

A coalition housed at the Decatur-based Task Force for Global Health has received a new five-year $29.97 million grant from the foundation, the nonprofit announced Friday morning.

The grant will fund the Coalition for Operational Research on Neglected Tropical Diseases (COR-NTD) – to support research and to continue efforts to control and eliminate five neglected tropical diseases.

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Commentary: Georgia’s a central city for global health

Original Story on WABE by Maria Saporta

The Task Force for Global Health – the largest nonprofit based in Georgia – received a significant endorsement this month. The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation awarded the Task Force with its 2016 Humanitarian Prize – which comes with a $2 million grant.

One of Atlanta’s best kept secrets is the Task Force for Global Health – an organization that has been busy saving lives around the world for the past 32 years.

The Task Force for Global Health is going to use new grant money to help launch a $15 million campaign that includes the acquisition of a signature building in downtown Decatur.

The Task Force for Global Health is going to use new grant money to help launch a $15 million campaign that includes the acquisition of a signature building in downtown Decatur.

But the secret is becoming more widely known with the prestigious $2 million prize from the Hilton Foundation.

The Task Force is going to use the money to help launch a $15 million campaign that includes the acquisition of a signature building in downtown Decatur. This potentially puts both the Task Force and Atlanta in the limelight as a center for global health and development.

Peter Laugharn, president of the Hilton Foundation, said the Task Force has been an unsung hero.

He also said its new building for the Task Force will be a way to shine a spotlight on the life-changing work underway in Atlanta.

It will have a conference space on the first floor where health professionals from around the world will be able to convene to work on a myriad of challenges facing those living in extreme poverty.

Atlanta has numerous organizations focused on global health – the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the private CDC Foundation, the Carter Center, CARE, MAP International and MedShare, plus several academic leaders, such as Emory University, Georgia State University and the Morehouse School of Medicine.

That’s not to mention the contributions by entities like Coca Cola Company, UPS, Delta Air Lines, Habitat for Humanity International and the American Cancer Society, among others.

While some of these organizations already work together on initiatives, their efforts could be much stronger if we had a way for all of them to collaborate more closely.

We’re already a leader in global health and development. It’s time for us to wear that crown proudly.

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Commentary: Michelle Nunn pushing for humanitarian movement

Original Story on WABE by Maria Saporta



Michelle Nunn, CEO of CARE USA, with Nisreen, a community representative in Asraq Refugee Camp in Jordan. MARY KATE MACISAAC / CARE

Michelle Nunn, CEO of CARE USA, with Nisreen, a community representative in Asraq Refugee Camp in Jordan.
MARY KATE MACISAAC / CARE

After losing her 2014 bid for the U.S. Senate, Michelle Nunn did not return to her role as CEO with the Points of Light Foundation. Instead, she was named president and CEO of CARE, an Atlanta-based international relief organization.

After six months as the president and CEO of CARE, Michelle Nunn is seeking a little help from her friends. She is hoping to engage key women leaders from Atlanta to help reduce extreme poverty around the world by focusing on the needs of women and children.

She wants them to become part of the Atlanta Women Really CARE group. Read more

Mark Rosenberg to receive award for global research on road safety

By Maria Saporta

Dr. Mark Rosenberg, president and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health, is being honored by Research!America, for his ground-breaking research in advancing injury prevention and road safety. Rosenberg will receive the 2013 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Award for Sustained National Leadership for reframing the concept that road traffic crashes are not accidents.

The award will be presented to Rosenberg at the 17th annual Research!America Advocacy Awards at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C. on March 13. The dinner attracts more than 400 leaders from government, industry, academia and health advocacy organizations to recognize top medical and health research advocates, who have made an impact in advancing the nation’s commitment toward research.

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Gates Foundation $28.8 million grant boosts city’s global health prominence

By Maria Saporta and Ruchika Tulshyan

Published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on Friday, February 8, 2013

Atlanta’s emergence as a center for global health was reaffirmed Feb. 4 when the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation awarded the Task Force for Global Health a $28.8 million grant to combat neglected tropical diseases.

The Decatur-based Task Force for Global Health, the fifth-largest nonprofit in the United States, is among a constellation of organizations based in Atlanta that is working to improve the lives of the most impoverished people in the world.

Gates Foundation to give $28.8 million to Task Force for Global Health

The Decatur-based Task Force for Global Health has received a five-year $28.8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to establish a support center for neglected tropical diseases.

The grant will enable the newly-established Neglected Tropical Diseases Support Center to collaborate with other partners around the world to address gaps in research. The center will coordinate with partners to implement the research agenda for these diseases, while ensuring the quick translation of new solutions into the program policy.

The Gates grant will be officially announced on Tuesday, Feb. 5.