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Remembering the 1906 Race Riot in Atlanta

By King Williams Last month marked the 113th anniversary of the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot. The three-day massacre occurred from Sept. 22-24, and once the flames were extinguished, Atlanta was forever changed. The city’s geographic boundaries, cultural significance, as well as business and political attitudes and practice have all been influenced by this tragedy, but […]

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'Good' Gentrification

By King Williams I often get asked if there’s a scenario where gentrification can be good. I fully understand why someone would ask this question, but the answer is a resounding no. After a lengthy and ongoing conversation on both my Instagram and Twitter accounts, I was notified about a particular clip making rounds on […]

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MAGA, abortion and transit

By King Williams en·mi·ty /ˈenmədē/ nounthe state or feeling of being actively opposed or hostile to someone or something. Earlier this week we saw the defeat of mass transit expansion in Gwinnett to start the week. And by the end of the week, we saw one of the most restrictive abortion bills in the nation […]

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The future of Metro Atlanta transit is pending on Gwinnett County

By King Williams Gwinnett County, the soon-to-be-largest county in Georgia by population, is the state’s most diverse county – representing a microcosm of what the future of American politics and economic development could look like. Gwinnett currently is a majority-minority county, meaning that no racial or ethnic group dominates its population. Gwinnett’s county-level leadership on […]

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Tobacco tax hike could raise half the $1 billion needed for transportation: Health care advocates

Six health care organizations are calling for an increase in the tobacco tax to help pay for statewide transportation improvements.
Raising the tax to the national average would bring in about $500 million a year, one lobbyist said. That represents about half of the $1 billion Georgia lawmakers intend to raise through the current proposal to raise money to improve the state’s transportation infrastructure.

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Legislature: Transit funding to be protected despite issues with Georgia Constitution

The author of the proposed $1 billion statewide transportation legislation said Thursday he is committed to ensure that the bill will fund transit, despite issues with the Georgia Constitution.
“In the bill, we talk about dedicating money toward transit,” said House Transportation Committee Chairman Jay Roberts (R-Ocilla). “We realize that you can’t dedicate [funding to transit] without a constitutional amendment…. Unfortunately, within the bill, I can’t put something in for the budget.”