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Charlotte Nash Freda Hardage

Gwinnett leaders still dreaming of more transit

Despite the MARTA referendum loss in Gwinnett County on March 19, county and transportation leaders stand firm on the need to bring transit to Georgia’s second largest county.

“Regardless of the way the vote went in March, there is so much need for transit and mobility relief in Gwinnett,” said Charlotte Nash, chair of the Gwinnett County Commission.

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MAGA, abortion and transit

By King Williams en·mi·ty /ˈenmədē/ noun the state or feeling of being actively opposed or hostile to someone or something. Earlier this week we saw the defeat of mass transit expansion in Gwinnett to start the week. And by the end of the week, we saw one of the most restrictive abortion bills in the […]

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The future of Metro Atlanta transit is pending on Gwinnett County

By King Williams Gwinnett County, the soon-to-be-largest county in Georgia by population, is the state’s most diverse county – representing a microcosm of what the future of American politics and economic development could look like. Gwinnett currently is a majority-minority county, meaning that no racial or ethnic group dominates its population. Gwinnett’s county-level leadership on […]

Officially or not, MARTA and Gwinnett have a long history

When I worked as a reporter for the Atlanta Journal back the mid-‘70s, I would rise before dawn to catch a MARTA bus at the corner of North Decatur Road and Scott Boulevard, along with a crowd of commuters who drove every day from Lilburn and Lawrenceville, parked in the North DeKalb Mall lot and made the second leg of their commute by public transit. I recall those days to make the point that however the referendum turns out March 19, commuters from Gwinnett County have been riding MARTA for a long time, and over the years, forking over a share of the sales taxes that support it at Atlanta lunch counters and stores.

$100 Billion

On Jan. 11, MARTA CEO Jeff Parker stood before the audience of the 6th annual State of MARTA address announcing that within the next few decades the metro Atlanta area would need to invest $100 billion in new transit & developments to meet future needs by 2045.

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Brian McGowan

Atlanta BeltLine at critical spot, seeks leader, debates transit

As published in the Atlanta Business Chronicle on July 13, 2018

Atlanta BeltLine Inc. stands at a critical juncture — at a time when its leadership is in a state of flux.

Brian McGowan, president and CEO of the city agency since September, has accepted a position to become CEO of the Greater Seattle Partnership and will be stepping down from the BeltLine in mid-August.