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Cuyahoga River fire, 1952

Targeted policies urgently needed for a speedy transition to clean energy

By Guest Columnist KAREN GRAINEY, assistant director of Center for a Sustainable Coast

The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued a monumental report on Oct. 8, warning that humanity has only 12 years to make the “rapid and far-reaching” reforms needed to prevent the worst effects of climate change. These reforms entail drastic reductions in the primary cause of global warming – greenhouse gas emissions.

RCE Greater Atlanta, youth tour

U.N.-affiliated sustainability network to be recognized at Center for Civil, Human Rights

By Guest Columnist JENNIFER HIRSCH, co-founder of RCE Greater Atlanta, with GARRY HARRIS and SERENA NEWHALL, steering committee members of RCE Greater Atlanta.

Atlanta’s regional sustainability network, RCE Greater Atlanta, will celebrate its recognition by the United Nations University at an event hosted Wednesday by the Center for Civil and Human Rights, an RCE member organization. A program for youth leadership in sustainability is among those to be celebrated.

proctor creek greenway, 2

Atlanta well positioned to continue efforts to thrive in an rapidly changing world

By Guest Columnist STEPHANIE STUCKEY, a sustainability expert

In May 2016, Atlanta became the final city to be part of 100 Resilient Cities (“100 RC”), a program pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation to help cities around the world become more resilient to the physical, social, and economic challenges that are a growing part of the 21st Century.

The Rockefeller network enables cities to increase the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, and systems to survive, adapt, and thrive no matter what chronic stresses or acute shocks they face.

Regional Center of Expertise

UN affiliate recognizes new regional center for sustainability in metro Atlanta

An affiliate of the United Nations has recognized a new Regional Center of Expertise in metro Atlanta as just the sixth such regional sustainability network in the United States. The RCE Greater Atlanta aims to advance education for sustainable development related to the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals, through smart sharing of information and collaborative programming among universities, governments, communities and the private sector.

solar roadway

All electricity used in Atlanta to be generated from renewables by 2035, says Atlanta City Council

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to reflect new language about Georgia Power’s posture on renewable energy. // The Atlanta City Council has resolved that all the electricity used in the city shall be generated through renewable resources by 2035. Advocates said the victory sets the stage for a push to bring the issue of clean energy for transportation into this year’s city elections.

bumble bee

Tips on how to garden sustainably

By Guest Columnist SUSAN VARLAMOFF, the former director of the University of Georgia’s Office of Environmental Sciences in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and lifetime Master Gardener

Landscapes occupy vast swaths of land across urban and suburban areas in the U.S. and how we cultivate our gardens directly affects the surrounding environment. Since Atlanta is bisected by the Chattahoochee River, which serves as a drinking water source, runoff from the land directly impacts the river’s water quality. Misuse or overuse of fertilizers and pesticides can result in water contamination as these chemicals run off the land during rain events.

bill eisenhauer dr. yomi noibi

Green infrastructure plan can link Atlanta’s HBCUs with Westside communities

Westside Atlanta represents the rise and fall and the impending revival of a community.

The historic core of the community is the Atlanta University Center, a consortium of historically-black colleges and universities. The consortium of the black colleges began in 1929.

“We were in the business of aspirations and dreams,” said Mary Schmidt Campbell, president of Spelman College.

drew traffic

Schools and Sprawl: The Impact of School Siting

By Guest Columnist KATHERINE MOORE, senior director of The Georgia Conservancy’s statewide Sustainable Growth program

This holiday season, I’m thankful for … an easier-than-normal commute.

School is out this week for Thanksgiving break, but if you’re like me, you may find yourself heading into the office at some point to escape from the excess of family time and turkey leftovers. With most metro-area schools deserted this week, you will no doubt enjoy a noticeably smoother and shorter commute.

Snapshot of the case history

By David Pendered Florida filed a lawsuit against Georgia in the U.S. Supreme Court after years of negotiations failed to resolve disputes over Georgia’s consumption of water from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin. The hearing began Monday in a federal courthouse in Washington. Lawyers for both sides expect to take up to six weeks to present […]

Solar power, Vidalia

Energy efficiency, Clean Power Plan would cut consumer costs, reduce use of dirty fuel

By Guest Columnist MARILYN A. BROWN, a professor at Georgia Tech’s School of Public Policy whose research focuses on energy, climate and environmental policy

In a year marked by ever deepening political divides, an unlikely consensus has formed between Georgia regulators and environmental advocates: energy bills must remain affordable as we transition to a low-carbon economy. My research on sustainable energy policies and the electric utility industry demonstrates that we can best achieve this result by using innovative tools already available to us.