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Let’s build Atlanta as a city, not a suburb

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It’s 2018, and the massive amounts of large-scale developments in Atlanta astound both long-time residents as well as newcomers.

The current pace of development rivals any of the other construction booms that Atlanta has had at any time in the modern era.

The danger is that we are replicating the suburban aesthetic and cultural environment of decades past by focusing on parking, car-oriented retail and a suburban design ethos with little regard for how these design choices work within the city.

King Williams

An introduction of SaportaReport’s newest columnist – King Williams

It started out with a simple question, “Momma, where did the people go?”

I was a young teen at the time, and the seemingly simple question perplexed my mom and also perplexed everyone else I would ask until I reached my senior year of college.

“Those people” were the people of East Lake Meadows, a public housing project on the Eastside of Atlanta which sat right in-between the city limits of Atlanta and my native city of Decatur.

MLK’s “Beloved Community” and the G-Word

An almost surefire way to start an argument in Atlanta is to utter the “G-word” – as in “gentrification.” In the midst of a torrid development boom, the inflow of affluent newcomers to Atlanta – and the involuntary uprooting of low-income residents that inevitably follows – reveals the racial and economic fault lines running through city’s social bedrock.