It’s all in how you deliver the message

They say that when you die, whether you’re going to heaven or hell, you have to go through Atlanta first. Though made popular by Atlanta’s very busy airport, that saying actually originated back in the day when Atlanta was a major railroad junction. At its peak, over 300 trains a day came and went through […]

Atlanta’s airport to get ads pasted on windows, hung from roof, and more

Atlanta’s airport could soon have advertising pasted on windows, hung from rooftop banners, and streamed across a screen above the central atrium.

The airport intends to open these areas, and more, as part of its upcoming contract with a company to sell and manage commercial advertising. The airport’s ad business now grosses more than $10 million a year, city records show.

It’s all part of the airport’s effort to reach its No. 1 goal with the new ad contract: “To increase Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport’s advertising revenue.” The airport could use the money, according to the city budget.

Bounced from bid for $22 million airport contract, Atlanta City Hall insider threatens to file lawsuit

A 40-year insider of Atlanta City Hall has threatened to sue the city if his bid is not reinstated for an airport contract that could be worth $22 million.

Aaron Turpeau is protesting a decision by Mayor Kasim Reed’s administration to dismiss Turpeau’s bid as unresponsive. Turpeau wants to continue his involvement in managing the airport’s consolidated rental car facility.

Turpeau last made local headlines during the 2009 mayoral campaign, when he was associated with a memo that suggested black voters should unite behind Lisa Borders in order to ensure the election of a black mayor. The memo characterized Reed as, “effectively out of the race” for mayor.

Atlanta audit indicates irregularities in parking contract at ATL airport

A concessions contract for the largest revenue producer for Atlanta’s airport is up for grabs even as the city auditor has just delivered a critical report on the effectiveness of the current management firm and its city contract.

The parking contract for Atlanta’s airport represents ¼ of the airport’s annual revenue. Parking fees alone bring in $117 million in revenue for fiscal year 2013, according to city Auditor Leslie Ward.

Parking is big business all across the country. The company that now handles the parking decks at Atlanta’s airport, SP Plus Corp., is based in Chicago, has more than 25,000 employees, and manages parking at facilities in the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico, according to the annual report it filed with the federal Securities and Exchange Commission.

New airport business alliance similar to successful economic development program in Gwinnett County

The newly formed Atlanta Aerotropolis Alliance bears a striking resemblance to Partnership Gwinnett, a public-private initiative that has created a strong record of economic development in Gwinnett County.

Each entity was formed to attract jobs and investments to their respective areas. One distinguishing point is that the aerotropolis alliance was convened by the Atlanta Regional Commission, whereas Partnership Gwinnett is based at the Gwinnett Chamber of Commerce.

ATL chief: Paulding County’s planned airport won’t thrive in tough industry

The planned commercial airport in Paulding County won’t do well in the competitive airline business, the chief of Atlanta’s airport on Wednesday told members of the Georgia Chamber of Commerce.

“The possibility of a second airport thriving is not so likely,” Louis Miller, general manager of Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport, told a group gathered in Atlanta for the annual State of the Ports Luncheon and Transportation Conference.

Hurdles at the proposed commercial airport include high operating costs for airlines, the trend toward bigger jet aircraft, and the history of aviation that favors new airports being built to relieve crowding at  smaller, older airports, Miller said.

Airport concessions: FAA legal review continues after quick council vote on administration’s plan in 2012

A year has passed since Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed signed the $3 billion airport concessions contracts, and the FAA still has the city’s process for selecting vendors under legal review.

Reed signed the contracts March 12, 2012. The FAA notified the city in April that the FAA contends four winning firms were not eligible for preferences they received in the city’s selection process, and thus should not be considered.

The Atlanta City Council approved the contracts after Reed’s administration had pressed for a quick vote on its choice of prime vendors to operate more than 150 storefronts. The administration wanted a vote 13 days after presenting its proposal. Ten of those days fell on weekends or holidays.

Hartsfield-Jackson provides runway for metro Atlanta’s growth

By Guest Columnist DARAKA E. SATCHER, partner and chief oprating officer at the Pendleton Group consulting firm

A few times a week, I have the privilege of working from a location where I have a great view of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport on a clear day. I can see the whole expanse of it and – if I give myself enough time to pay attention for a moment – observe a few planes land or take off.

In other words, it is the ebb and flow of airport functions that can be seen at a number of places throughout the world. I’ve seen enough of that to not be too fascinated by it, but I often have a different reaction watching these run-of-the-mill activities occur at Hartsfield-Jackson. Because every now and then, I recognize that I’m actually watching the primary engine behind the phenomenon of world-shrinking.

Future of Gwinnett County’s airport an issue for Gwinnett to resolve, GDOT official says

The proposed privatization of Gwinnett County’s airport is a local matter in which the state won’t intervene, according to the state official who oversees aviation for the state Department of Transportation.

Gwinnett residents and leaders have wrestled for years with the question of what to do with Briscoe Field, located along Ga. 316 about two miles northeast of Lawrenceville. At the heart of the issue is a debate over whether to allow commercial passenger service – and the impact that would have on neighborhoods near the airport.

Speaking Tuesday to the Rotary Club of Gwinnett County, Carol Comer said the state has no role in deciding or recommending the future of the airport. Comer directs GDOT’s Intermodal Division, which oversees systems including aviation, transit, rail, ports and waterways.